Marshwood Adult Education Family Classes Coming Up…

Check these out at: https://marshwood.coursestorm.com/

Family Paint Nights

 

Looking for a new, creative activity to do with your child? This parent-child paint class is a great opportunity to learn and have fun together. Participants will follow the instructor through a step-by-step process, learning and applying different acrylic painting techniques, to produce fun, fresh finished paintings on canvas. The class is suitable for parents with children nine years old and up.  Wear clothes you won’t mind getting paint on.

Class fee includes all materials for both participants.

Everyone is welcome

 

Family Hiking Fun, Saturday, September 23, 10am-12noon, Meet at Vaughn Woods Parking Area,

Meet John at Vaughn Woods State Park and discover the fun of taking a family hike.  John will share tips for choosing the right location, equipment and supplies.  John will also discuss age and terrain appropriate hiking for families of all ages.  Price is $50 per family.

Exciting News!  The Marshwood and Kittery Adult Education programs are pleased to announce that Nancy Mann and Donna Bethke-Borg received awards at last week’s Maine Adult Education Association Annual Conference.

Exciting News!  The Marshwood and Kittery Adult Education programs are pleased to announce that Nancy Mann and Donna Bethke-Borg received awards at last week’s Maine Adult Education Association Annual Conference.
Nancy received the Maine Adult Education Outstanding Teacher of the Year
Award,
Donna received the Distinguished Service In Adult Education (Volunteer) Award,

Marshwood Adult Education Graduation

for pictures go to: http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/20170602/adult-ed-students-receive-diplomas

Adult Ed. students receive diplomas

June 1, 2017

By Ralph Morang news@fosters.com

SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — As the 2017 graduates of the Marshwood Adult Education program lined up for a rehearsal of their ceremony Thursday night, Administrative Assistant Joan Wade gave a final instruction.

“All tassels go on the right side,” she said.

On the stage of the Wesley E. Kennedy Performing Arts Center, 15 students received either high school diplomas or were recipients of high school equivalency test certificates (HiSET).

Students can take several months or several years to complete the diploma program, and the school holds practice tests for those in the HiSET program.

Rehearsal over, parents, friends and supporters filed into the auditorium. Adult Education Director Lorraine Robida welcomed everyone, saying, “These graduate have reached a milestone, they did it.”

MSAD35 Superintendent of Schools Dr. Mary Nash told them, “This graduation is so special.” Each student had his or her eduction interrupted but has moved forward, she said. “Congratulations on behalf of the school board of directors.”

Graduate Daniel MacDonald spoke to the audience.

“It is a moment, isn’t it?” he said. MacDonald said a year ago he would have been called “a headache” or a “train wreck.” Today, he calls himself “recovered.”

He spoke of the obstacles he has overcome.

“On June 17, I will have completed a year of sobriety,” he said.

Then he spoke of his father. “He was a powerhouse,” he said, and told how he lost him to a heart attack last September.

MacDonald ended with by reading a poem to his father about going back to school.

“I did it all for you” was the last line.

Peyton Rix followed, saying how she got support to go back to school.

“They helped me get my priorities in order,” she said. “They never stopped believing in me.”

As School Board of Directors Chair Keri Tice read out the names, Dr. Nash handed out diplomas and certificates.

Brothers Kashir and Armando White were in the HiSET program. According to Wade, Kashir began his return to education in the diploma program but switched to the HiSET track when Armando joined him.

After dropping out of school in December, Karyzmah Barnett, 18, of South Berwick, returned and after six months, received her diploma.

Out in the lobby afterwards, there were hugs and cake. Emma Zachau, 20, of South Berwick, was hugged by her mother, Jennifer Gorman. Emma had dropped out of school her senior year. She said she returned to school “because I wanted to do something for me.”

The 2017 Marshwood Adult Eduction diploma graduates are Karyzmah Barnett, Daniel MacDonald, Emily Palmer and Peyton Rix. The HiSET certificate recipients are Brianna Blanchett, Brent Croteau, Damon Davis, R. J. Martin, Jr, Spencer Moynahan, Myra Sallet, Carlos Tetu, Armando White, Kashir White and Emma Zachau.

The District budget meeting is over. What happens next? Use the link below for a video response from Dr. Nash. Text follows.

http://www.rsu35.org/blog/2017/05/22/the-district-budget-meeting-is-over-what-happens-next/

The District Budget Meeting is over. What happens next?

Text of the video response by Dr. Nash:  The District budget meeting is over. What happens next?

On Wednesday, May 17th, the citizens of Eliot and South Berwick overwhelmingly voted to send

the district’s budget for next year to the voters for final approval. The citizens at the District

Budget Meeting also voted to endorse the important 16th warrant authorizing the Board to use

any additional state subsidy to invest in the restoration of programming in the district next year.

However, our work is not done! MSAD 35 has a two-step process for approving the budget.

The district budget meeting is only the first step in this process. The Budget Validation

Referendum is the important second step and voters must approve the budget at each step for the district to have a finalized budget.

The District Budget Validation Referendum will be held this year on June 13, 2017. If the

budget fails the referendum vote, the whole budget process starts all over again and here is how it would work. The Superintendent’s office would prepare and present a new budget to the

Board. The Board would recommend a new budget to the community at another District Budget

Meeting, and the budget approved at this new District Budget Meeting would be sent to another

Budget Validation Referendum.

According to state law the School Board must hold additional District Budget Meetings and

Budget Validation Referendums until a budget is finally approved by the voters. If the voters do

not approve a budget before the beginning of the fiscal year, July 1st, the budget approved at the most recent District Budget Meeting on May 17th is automatically considered the budget for the ensuing year until the voters approve a budget at a Budget Validation Referendum.

Because principals need to staff their classrooms, purchase supplies and have their buildings

ready to open in September, operating, even for a short time without a finalized budget, would be a nightmare for the entire District.

The people of Eliot and South Berwick are hard-working people who play by the rules and try to

make ends meet. Over the past 50+ years, the people of our community have built and

developed a school district that is one of the top performing districts in the state. Let us continue

to work together to keep Marshwood strong!

Please remember to vote on June 13, 2017. If you cannot vote in person on June 13, 2017,

absentee ballot applications are available at the Superintendent’s Office, at each school’s office,

at each Town Hall Office and online at maine.gov.

School Resource Officer Jeff Upton

SRO Jeff Upton

Serving RSU #35 and the Town of South Berwick

jeff.upton@rsu35.org

website:  https://sites.google.com/a/rsu35.org/school-resource-officer-jeff-upton/

This site is set up to be a resource to the entire RSU #35 community in both South Berwick and Eliot.  It is not all inclusive of the issues that our students and parents face on a day to day basis, but it does provide information for many of the topics that are brought up throughout the school year.  If there is information that you feel would be helpful on this site, please email me so that I can get the information out.  Also, please understand that this is a basic resource and you are more than welcome to call me or email me should you have further questions.

How Are School Districts Preparing For LePage’s Proposed Education Cuts? Listen to Superintendent Dr. Mary Nash respond to this question: http://www.tinyurl.com/mm46f82

How Are School Districts Preparing For LePage’s Proposed Education Cuts?

Listen to Superintendent  Dr. Mary Nash respond to this question: http://www.tinyurl.com/mm46f82 

How Are School Districts Preparing For LePage’s Proposed Education Cuts?

By ROBBIE FEINBERG • 2 HOURS AGO

Listen Listening…    http://www.tinyurl.com/mm46f82

3:04 / 3:13 How Are School Districts Preparing For LePage’s Proposed Education Cuts?

In his budget proposal released earlier this year, Gov. Paul LePage vowed to drastically transform how schools are funded. The most notable change was the removal of roughly $40 million that the state gives local districts to help pay the salaries of administrators.

In his State of the State address, LePage hammered home the point that he thinks there are far too many administrators in Maine’s schools. Most notably, he pointed to the more than 100 school superintendents across the state.

“We are the biggest outlier in the country when it comes to superintendents,” he says. “We are just out of control. We need to seek accountability.”

Among many changes, LePage’s new budget would remove all state money for those administrators — about $40 million.

The new funding formula would boost allocations for some districts. Lewiston, for example, would receive an additional $4 million, and districts in Wells and Kittery would see at least another $100,000. However, other districts are looking at deficits that have them worried.

“There’s a point where you can’t do it with what you’ve got,” says Mary Nash, superintendent for MSAD 35, which covers Eliot and South Berwick.

Under the new budget plan, Nash says her district is looking at a loss of more than $750,000 in state funds. She says the district would have to cut teachers and increase class sizes across every grade in order to balance its books.

Nash says she understands that the governor wants to decrease administrative costs and direct more money toward student instruction, but she says his plan would likely wind up hurting students in her district instead.

“These cuts are so significant. They will impact every single one of our students next year. There’s no question,” she says. “And that’s what’s at stake for us.”

In RSU 18, in the Belgrade Lakes region, Superintendent Gary Smith is looking at similar losses.

“We are getting too good at cutting,” he says. “Each year, and this year’s no different.”

Smith says for the past eight years, his district’s budget has increased by only about 2 percent. But this year, he expects to reduce the staff by the equivalent of five-and-a-half positions.

On top of that, Smith says he’s asking local voters to put up extra money this year to help cover losses from the state. But he’s unsure how much more they will agree to pay in property taxes.

“I’m expecting, because we have some of the lowest mill rates in Kennebec County, I expect some very good questioning about a 3.25 percent budget increase,” he says.

While the cuts in these districts are severe, they aren’t set in stone. The Legislature will continue to debate the budget over the next few months.

Earlier this month, dozens of educators packed a budget hearing to testify against the proposal. Many were critical of the fact that the plan ignores a referendum approved this past fall that boosts education funding through a surtax on wealthier households.

Ultimately, school officials say they are optimistic that the Legislature will include more funding for education in its final budget. But in the meantime, they have to be prepared.

Budget Timeline for Budget for Fiscal Year 2018

Budget Timeline for Budget for Fiscal Year 2018

January 30, 2017 – Principals and Directors submit preliminary budget sheets to Superintendent

March 1, 2017 – Superintendent presents the budget to the School Board

March 15, 2017 – Two hour School Board and Public Budget Workshop with the Superintendent and Administrative Staff – 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Learning Center at Marshwood High School (Middle School / High School / Athletics)

April 5, 2017 – Two hour School Board and Public Budget Workshop with the Superintendent and Elementary School Administrators – 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Learning Center at Marshwood High School (Eliot Elementary School / Central School / Marshwood Great Works School)

April 12, 2017 – Two hour School Board and Public Budget Workshop with the Superintendent and Middle and High School Administrators – 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in the Learning Center at Marshwood High School (Central Office / Special Education / Technology / Facilities / Transportation / Federal Grants / Adult Education )

April 26, 2017 Two hour School Board and Public Budget Workshop if necessary

May 3, 2017 – School Board approves the FY18 Budget

May 17, 2017 – District Budget Meeting:  The public approves the district budget warrant articles

June 13, 2017 – Budget Validation Referendum

Link for Superintendent’s Recommended Budget: http://www.rsu35.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Superintendents-Recommended-Budget-FY18-Overview-Dated-March-1-2017.pdf

American Red Cross Blood Drive at Marshwood HS – March 10, 2017

American Red Cross Blood Drive at Marshwood HS – March 10, 2017

There is an urgent need for blood and platelets

The Marshwood HS Blood Drive Committee is sponsoring a blood drive on:

Friday March 10, 2017  1:00 PM – 6:00 PM, Marshwood High School Gymnasium

You can reserve a donation time at the American Red Cross website or use this link:

http://www.redcrossblood.org/

If you know that your blood type is O, consider being a “power red” donor.

For more information about being a “power red” donor, donating platelets or signing up for rapid pass, please go to the American Red Cross web site.

Please contact Joanne Roberts RN – School Nurse with any questions 207.384.4500

Marshwood Adult Education is Very Proud of Their Former Student, Maryna Shuliakouskaya

for photos: http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/20170109/woman-learns-english-then-opens-aroma-joes

Woman learns English, Then Opens Aroma Joe’s

Jan 9, 2017 at 3:59  By Mark Kobzik news@seacoastonline.com

KITTERY, Maine – When Maryna Shuliakouskaya arrived in the United States from Belarus, a small landlocked country on Russia’s border, she didn’t speak any English. Now, 10 years later, she has opened her third Aroma Joe’s franchise in Kittery.

“I’ve already been in the United States for 10 years and looking back another five, I feel like I was born in the business world,” Shuliakouskaya said. “My dad always tried to open some kind of business during some pretty tough years back home. Belarus is right next to Russia, it’s part of the former Soviet Union, and it was pretty hard to open your own business. Especially under a communist government.”

She arrived in the United States having completed five years of college education at home. Her plan was to stay long enough to make $5,000 and then return home to Belarus. When she met her future husband, Adam Young, those plans changed.

Shuliakouskaya’s first job was with Young at the Weathervane restaurant in Kittery. She began to teach herself English, along with help from Adam, by studying receipts to learn the names of food and drinks.

“She caught my eye because of how hard working she is. She brings a passion to the work that she does. One reason I felt attracted to her was her drive to succeed,” Young said.

Only three months after meeting, Shuliakouskaya and Young married and have been business partners ever since. They work together to run three Aroma Joe’s franchises, with Young managing the newest location in Kittery.

Shuliakouskaya had almost graduated with a computer science degree in Belarus, but she had to drop out once she decided to stay in the United States.

“You pretty much feel like you’re someone and then you’re no one. I’m a dreamer, so I wasn’t going to give up. There were times when I was ready to pack my clothes and go back,” she said.

Without speaking English, she continued working various jobs until deciding that she wanted more. Shuliakouskaya completed math and English courses at Marshwood High School’s Adult Education program before she went to York County Community College, the first of three colleges in the United States where she has earned degrees.

MORE VIDEO: Shon Parham (1) makes a 3-pointer as Portsmouth improves to 5-0 in Divisi…

At one point Shuliakouskaya lost her work visa and couldn’t drive or work. As Young described it, she was housebound taking care of their newborn baby. But with the help of Young and others, Shuliakouskaya started making it to classes at Marshwood High School. Steve Boillot, her language teacher, visited her home to study and even helped her get admitted to the University of Southern Maine.

She obtained a degree in international business at USM before going to Southern New Hampshire University for her master’s in marketing. Between classes and her jobs, Shuliakouskaya was working 70-80 hours a week. Now she says her life is even busier with owning a business, being a marketing director for Subway, and raising the couple’s children Nellie, 8, and Nadia, 5 months, at their home in Eliot.

In 2013, Shuliakouskaya was approached by her boss at Subway, where she had been a manager and later a marketing assistant, with the offer of opening an Aroma Joe’s. Two years later, she opened her second location in Gorham. The Kittery location opened in November.

Shuliakouskaya now gives inspirational talks to students at Thornton Academy and Marshwood High School, and she also teaches business and marketing at Great Bay Community College. She tells her students that working hard means giving your best effort to everything you do.

“You can achieve something if you work really hard. Don’t give yourself excuses, I hate excuses. You have time for everything. When someone tells me ‘I didn’t have time,’ I lose my mind. Time is for everything. It depends on how you prioritize,” Shuliakouskaya said.

“What was your comment? asked Young.

“You can sleep when you’re dead,” Shuliakouskaya replied.

In Photos

Adam Young and Maryna Shuliakouskaya of Eliot in their recently opened Aroma Joe’s Coffee shop at the new Rockwell Center on Route 236 in Kittery. Photo by Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline

Maryna Shuliakouskaya and her husband, Adam Young, who live in Eliot, recently opened an Aroma Joe’s coffee shop on Route 236 in Kittery. Photo by Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline

Adam Young and Maryna Shuliakouskaya of Eliot in their recently opened Aroma Joe’s Coffee shop at the new Rockwell Center on Route 236 in Kittery. Photo by Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline

Maryna Shuliakouskaya and her husband, Adam Young, who live in Eliot, recently opened an Aroma Joe’s coffee shop on Route 236 in Kittery. Photo by Rich Beauchesne/Seacoastonline