Wyatt Stout, was one of the grand prize winners in the Scholastic “Express Yourself” poetry contest

Marshwood Great Works School teacher, Elizabeth Morrison,  announced that her student,  Wyatt Stout was one of the grand prize winners in the Scholastic “Express Yourself” poetry contest.  Wyatt won a $400 gift certificate to Scholastic.  Wyatt’s winning entry:
MYSELF

I’m the best myself
I don’t depress myself
I professionally yet humbly express myself

I invest in myself
I’m no less than myself
I’m better than anyone at being myself

I’m seeing myself
I’m improving myself
I’m ruling and schooling and dooling myself
These meanings are pooling myself is improving
and towmaro my lifes even cooler than ruling

I won’t be depressed I’m only the best
my life will be an eternal test
and myself will constantly be
expressed

By Wyatt Stout

Janice Marro is Named Teacher of the Year by VFW

Janice Marro is Named Teacher of the Year by VFW

Janice Marro from Marshwood Great Works School has won the Smart/Maher VFW National Citizenship Education Teacher Award in 2017, for the state of Maine.  The VFW launched the Smart/Maher National Citizenship Education Teacher Award in 1999 to recognize classroom teachers for promoting citizenship education.  Marro has been the music teacher at GWS since September 2003.  Marro works hard to help her students make a connection with their community.

In Marro’s nomination letter, written by Jerry Burnell, Principal of GWS, he notes that Marro has organized the Veterans’ Assembly at the school for the past eight years.  “The Veterans are humbled by the attention and so many have spoken to me with tears in their eyes of how much they appreciate our support.  In looking at the VFW criteria, Marro is exactly what you are looking for in a teacher.  She makes positive differences in the lives of her students and communities.”

from the Weekly Sentinel  June 9, 2017

om the Weekly Sentinel June 9, 2017

Marshwood Great Works School’s Video Game Creations!

Marshwood Great Works teachers Rhonda Miller, Christal Villemaire and Janice Marro have combined art and music classes on Thursdays to collaborate on a video game creating project with some 4th and 5th grade classes. The students sketched characters and planned a game. They used a program called Scratch to make the characters, add backdrops and movement.  Then they created original soundtracks for their video games by using a program called Soundation! 

There are so many pieces to this project and the results are AMAZING! 

We invite you to come try out the games created by MGWS students!

We look forward to seeing you!

Janice Marro, Rhonda Miller and Christal Villemaire

Video Game Creations!

We invite you to try out the video games that students created!

When: Thursday, June 15th

9:30-10:30am- Mrs. Visciano, Mrs. Williams & Mr. Winchester

12:50- 1:50pm- Mrs. Chidester & Mrs. Lindgren

1:55-2:55pm- Mrs. Girouard & Mrs. Starkey

Where: MGWS Cafeteria

Rain Turns Solar Car Race into ‘Duracell Derby’

May 26, 2017 By Ralph Morang news@seacoastonline.com

to see photos mentioned below go to: http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/20170526/rain-turns-solar-car-race-into-duracell-derby

HIDE CAPTION

Kenai Diaz, center, waits for the start signal during a heat in the annual fifth grade solar car race at Marshwood Great Works School in South Berwick on Friday. Cars raced indoors with battery packs instead of solar panels because of rain. [Ralph Morang photo]

HIDE CAPTION

McKenzie Shaw, Lydia Ruksznis and Alexandra Nichols remove the battery pack from their car “Recycled Force” after racing in the annual fifth-grade solar car race at Marshwood Great Works School in South Berwick, Maine, on Friday. Cars raced indoors with battery packs instead of solar panels because of rain. [Ralph Morang photo]

HIDE CAPTION

Race crews cheer on their cars during a heat in the annual fifth-grade solar car race at Marshwood Great Works School in South Berwick on Friday. Cars raced indoors with battery packs instead of solar panels because of rain. [Ralph Morang photo]

HIDE CAPTION

Kenai Diaz, center, waits for the start signal during a heat in the annual fifth grade solar car race at Marshwood Great Works School in South Berwick on Friday. Cars raced indoors with battery packs instead of solar panels because of rain. [Ralph Morang photo]

HIDE CAPTION

McKenzie Shaw, Lydia Ruksznis and Alexandra Nichols remove the battery pack from their car “Recycled Force” after racing in the annual fifth-grade solar car race at Marshwood Great Works School in South Berwick, Maine, on Friday. Cars raced indoors with battery packs instead of solar panels because of rain. [Ralph Morang photo]

SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — The annual fifth-grade solar car race at Marshwood Great Works School was forced indoors Friday because of the lack of sun and abundance of rain.

But spirits were not dampened as solar panels were replaced with AA battery packs and racing took place in the gymnasium.

The students in the seven fifth-grade classes broke into teams to build 49 cars, originally intended to be solar-powered for the race. Sacopee Energy and Climate Activities runs the race and supplies the electric motors and 3-watt solar panels (and as backup, battery packs) and the students build the model cars with recycled materials.

In class, students study mechanics and aerodynamics. Using cardboard, old boxes, parts from toys and found decorations, students build their cars with hot glue and duct tape. Wheels range from Tinker Toys to old compact discs. Motors drive wheels with a rubber band. Each car has to hold an empty soda can, a payload to be recycled.

Teacher and race coordinator Lori Girouard said it is a great experience for the kids to design their cars from scratch. “If they can create a car, be proud of that,” she said. “If the car moves, even better.”

Two race courses of four lanes each were laid out. Fishing line was stretched from start to finish to keep the cars on track.

Race master was former classroom teacher Peter Zack of Porter, who was assisted by Frank Gillson of South Berwick.

Zack said Great Works School is a cool place. He said the teachers, parents and other volunteers and Principal Jerry Brunelle were very supportive. He began the show by announcing this was his “20th or 21st race” at GWS and that it had become “the Duracell Derby.”

Tristan Bailey, Aiden Brogan and Caleb Boyle carried their large, sleek car, “Phoenix,” to the start. Three girls carried a car made from a box called “The Happy Camper RV.” Another glittering car shaped like a crayon was called “Crayon.”

The first eight cars and racing teams appeared out of the crowd at the starting lines and they were off. Well, mostly they were off. Some cars had rubber band problems, or wobbly wheels or just got stuck. A few whizzed by.

Gloria and Carroll Holmes watched from the sidelines as they have over the years. They were cheering their fourth grandchild-racer, Liam Connors. “It’s fun to root for your own, but it’s fun to see the cars,” Gloria said.

After losing a heat, Andrew Layton, sporting a fedora, was asked if his car ruled. “It ruled, but it lost,” he said.

After a few heats, crews headed for the racing pits in the hallway for repairs, where Marshwood High School student volunteer Sydney Page supervised the hot glue gun table. “I’m more of an animal science person,” she said.

The double-elimination heats soon left six contestants, and the winning car was “Phoenix,” built by Tristan Bailey, Aiden Brogan and Caleb Boyle.

Zack said the top six cars and creators would be invited to the Paris Elementary School race in South Paris June 3.

From the MGWS Dig It Club

Hello gardeners! Marshwood Great Works School’s Dig It Club is planting a pollinator garden. We would so appreciate any donations of pollinator plants from your gardens: echinacea, rudbeckia (black-eyed susan), New England aster, coreopsis (tickseed), gallardia (blanketflower) are a few suggestions.
 
If you have enough to share, please just leave your donation at the entrance of our Reading Garden at the front of Great Works School on Academy Street. Thank you for helping us show the kids that every little garden can make a difference!

GREAT WORKS SCHOOL Events and Dates

Wednesday, May 17 District Budge Meeting   7:00pm  MHS Auditorium

May 18 MHS band performs at GWS

May 19 Trips to Gundalow begin

May 25 Spring Concert 1:30 am and 7:00 pm

May 26 Solar Car Races

May 29 Memorial Day No School

May 31 Walk and Bike to School

June 2 Step-up Day Grade 5 to MMS

June 8 Literacy Carnival

June 7 Step-up Day for Grade 3 from EES and CES

June 9  Potato Project

June 16 Last Day of School (half day)

Aug 30 Open House and Parent Night 5:00-6:30

Sept. 5  First Day of School

Marshwood Great Works School Students and Staff join Marshwood High School HOLD Students and Hike at Pinkham Notch

From Wednesday, April 26th through Friday, April 28th, three 5th grade classes from Marshwood Great Works School (Chidester, Phipps, Girouard) went to Pinkham Notch.  Students in this hiking group used a GoPro 3 camera and a Canon HD camcorder to document their experiences.  Over 3 hours of video was taken on this 3 day trip.  It has been edited to 4 1/2 minutes with music.

Follow the link below to view the video:

https://www.wevideo.com/view/911485093

School Resource Officer Jeff Upton

SRO Jeff Upton

Serving RSU #35 and the Town of South Berwick

jeff.upton@rsu35.org

website:  https://sites.google.com/a/rsu35.org/school-resource-officer-jeff-upton/

This site is set up to be a resource to the entire RSU #35 community in both South Berwick and Eliot.  It is not all inclusive of the issues that our students and parents face on a day to day basis, but it does provide information for many of the topics that are brought up throughout the school year.  If there is information that you feel would be helpful on this site, please email me so that I can get the information out.  Also, please understand that this is a basic resource and you are more than welcome to call me or email me should you have further questions.

Chris Winchester’s Marshwood Great Works School Classroom wins Boston Bruins Battle of the Books Fourth Weekly Prize

Mr. Winchester’s class participated in a reading contest in March. Children were assigned sixteen picture and chapter books. Those books were read to the class.  Students voted for their favorites over the course of several school days.  Touch Blue by Cynthia Lord was the winner.

Prizes arrived before April vacation.

For more information of this contest, please visit:

https://www.nhl.com/bruins/community/battle-of-the-books

“The Most Epic Birthday Party Ever”

The students from Marshwood Great Works School Present:  “The Most Epic Birthday Party Ever”, 4/13 at 9:30am and  7:00pm  The entire cast invites all of their local friends and family to see this super FUN, family-friendly musical.  Join them at Marshwood Great Works School! The show runs under an hour and there is no cost for admission, but donations will be welcome at the door! Hope to see you there!!????

Marshwood Great Works School students from Mr. Winchester’s fourth grade class

Marshwood Great Works School students from Mr. Winchester’s fourth grade class hiked with Mr. Winchester and Physical Education teacher Mr. Pollock, to visit with retired educator and South Berwick resident, Mrs. Linda Becker.  They met at the Vine Street Bridge in South Berwick. Mrs. Becker shared the history of South Berwick.  She focused the Leigh’s Mill Pond area.  Mrs. Becker presented the new vision for the area- a covered bridge project that would reconnect the divided neighborhoods.

This special presentation enriches the fourth grade social studies unit “Maine and its History”.

Great Works School Students to Perform Musical “The Most Epic Birthday Party Ever!”

Great Works School Students to Perform Musical

“The Most Epic Birthday Party Ever!” will be performed by students from the Marshwood Great Works School in South Berwick, Maine. [Photo/Courtesy of Great Works School]

Apr 3, 2017 for photos: http://www.fosters.com/news/20170403/great-works-school-students-to-perform-musical

SOUTH BERWICK, Maine — Students at Marshwood Great Works School have been busy rehearsing and setting the festive stage for this year’s fifth-grade musical, “The Most Epic Birthday Party Ever!”

Skyler is about to turn 12, and she’s planned the biggest celebration of the year. But in the middle of the party, something mysterious happens — all the adults suddenly vanish! Trapped in the backyard, the kids realize they must create a brand new society. However, when they elect Skyler’s older brother, Charlie, as their ruler, things really begin to spin out of control. Eventually the kids learn a big lesson in responsibility, while Skyler and Charlie develop a greater respect for one another.

Marshwood Great Works School Music Teacher and Music Director Janice Marro was initially a little unsure about putting on the production since they had been performing Disney shows for the past few years.

“After reading the script and listening to the songs, it was clear that this was going to be a fun show. We are so fortunate to have so many talented students and were happy to be able to cast 60 kids in this production. This cast has proven to be one of the hardest working, most dedicated groups of students I have had the pleasure of working with! They have done an incredible job taking this script and music and making it their own. I am really excited for everybody to see this production … it is sure to be EPIC!,” she said.

Winner of the 2014 Children’s Musical Theatre Festival in New York City, “The Most Epic Birthday Party Ever” combines the average backyard birthday party with the storytelling, events and music of an epic major motion picture.

Fifth-grade Great Works School teacher and director Pam Starkey has been thrilled with the progress of the production and the talented cast. “We are having so much fun with this show! It is a perfect combination of acting and singing for our fifth graders,” she said.

In addition to the 60 fifth-grade cast members, there are 25 students singing in the chorus, 20 working on the set and props, and 10 students in the backstage. With more than 100 students involved in the production, this is the largest cast they have ever worked with.

“This is the most fun experience I have ever had,” said fifth-grader Ryan Howell, who plays Charlie. “Everyone is working so hard and it is all starting to come together. We can’t wait to share this with everyone,” he added.

Performances of “The Most Epic Birthday Party Ever” will be Thursday, April 13, at 9:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., at Marshwood Great Works School. There is no cost for admission but donations will be welcome at the door.

How Are School Districts Preparing For LePage’s Proposed Education Cuts? Listen to Superintendent Dr. Mary Nash respond to this question: http://www.tinyurl.com/mm46f82

How Are School Districts Preparing For LePage’s Proposed Education Cuts?

Listen to Superintendent  Dr. Mary Nash respond to this question: http://www.tinyurl.com/mm46f82 

How Are School Districts Preparing For LePage’s Proposed Education Cuts?

By ROBBIE FEINBERG • 2 HOURS AGO

Listen Listening…    http://www.tinyurl.com/mm46f82

3:04 / 3:13 How Are School Districts Preparing For LePage’s Proposed Education Cuts?

In his budget proposal released earlier this year, Gov. Paul LePage vowed to drastically transform how schools are funded. The most notable change was the removal of roughly $40 million that the state gives local districts to help pay the salaries of administrators.

In his State of the State address, LePage hammered home the point that he thinks there are far too many administrators in Maine’s schools. Most notably, he pointed to the more than 100 school superintendents across the state.

“We are the biggest outlier in the country when it comes to superintendents,” he says. “We are just out of control. We need to seek accountability.”

Among many changes, LePage’s new budget would remove all state money for those administrators — about $40 million.

The new funding formula would boost allocations for some districts. Lewiston, for example, would receive an additional $4 million, and districts in Wells and Kittery would see at least another $100,000. However, other districts are looking at deficits that have them worried.

“There’s a point where you can’t do it with what you’ve got,” says Mary Nash, superintendent for MSAD 35, which covers Eliot and South Berwick.

Under the new budget plan, Nash says her district is looking at a loss of more than $750,000 in state funds. She says the district would have to cut teachers and increase class sizes across every grade in order to balance its books.

Nash says she understands that the governor wants to decrease administrative costs and direct more money toward student instruction, but she says his plan would likely wind up hurting students in her district instead.

“These cuts are so significant. They will impact every single one of our students next year. There’s no question,” she says. “And that’s what’s at stake for us.”

In RSU 18, in the Belgrade Lakes region, Superintendent Gary Smith is looking at similar losses.

“We are getting too good at cutting,” he says. “Each year, and this year’s no different.”

Smith says for the past eight years, his district’s budget has increased by only about 2 percent. But this year, he expects to reduce the staff by the equivalent of five-and-a-half positions.

On top of that, Smith says he’s asking local voters to put up extra money this year to help cover losses from the state. But he’s unsure how much more they will agree to pay in property taxes.

“I’m expecting, because we have some of the lowest mill rates in Kennebec County, I expect some very good questioning about a 3.25 percent budget increase,” he says.

While the cuts in these districts are severe, they aren’t set in stone. The Legislature will continue to debate the budget over the next few months.

Earlier this month, dozens of educators packed a budget hearing to testify against the proposal. Many were critical of the fact that the plan ignores a referendum approved this past fall that boosts education funding through a surtax on wealthier households.

Ultimately, school officials say they are optimistic that the Legislature will include more funding for education in its final budget. But in the meantime, they have to be prepared.

Great Works School is Participating in the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) “Pennies for Patients” Program.

The students on the BIONIC (Believe It Or Not I Care) Team are spearheading this fundraiser.
A kick-off assembly was held on Wednesday, March 8. Derek, a representative from LLS, shared a very brief overview of blood cancers. Students began collecting on March 9 and they will be collecting money through March 24. On-line donations are also welcome. The classroom that raises the most money will win a pizza party. Each classroom has a goal of $100 and the school goal is $1400. Last year students raised $3200- double the school goal!
This is the link to the web page for on-line donations:
http://events.lls.org/pages/ma/MarshwoodGreatWorksSchool-2017

The Marshwood Grade 5 & 6 Math Teams traveled to Portland for the Southern Maine Elementary Math Meet

The Marshwood Grade 5 & 6 Math Teams traveled to Portland for the Southern Maine Elementary Math Meet last week with Ms. Roy and Ms. Jacobs .  It was a great experience for our students! There were  50+ teams from Southern Maine competing in 3 rounds of challenging math problems. The 6th grade team took home a trophy for 3rd place in the 6th grade meet ! The 5th grade team placed 19th in the meet.  We look forward to 2 more meets this year. The next meet is scheduled for March 14th (Pi Day) The fifth grade team includes: Ryan Howell,Kenai Diaz, Rowan Nabel, Libby Houghton, Annika Oberg, Aoife Coomey, Camden Marcotte, Kayley Lin.  The sixth grade team includes: Grace Ducharme, Sophie Lusenhop, Leah Maddison, Ryan Pote, William Sandusky, Abby Simonelli, Riley St. Pierre, Mitchell Vlcek, Sean Williams, Helen Willoughby and Jonah Nobel.

Beckett Barlow Wins Marshwood Great Works School Level National Geography Bee

Beckett Barlow, a grade 5 student won the school competition of the National Geographic Bee.  The school bee, at which students answered questions on geography, was the first round in the 29th annual National Geographic Bee.

The second place finisher was fifth grader, Luke Nelson. Fourteen GWS students participated in this national competition. 

Kiersyn Boyle

Colin Barker

Tyler Hussey

Ella Bogh

Lucy Brogan

Shannon Pino

Teagan Kennedy

Chyanne Simms

Stella Case

Luke Nelson

Sarah Galvin

Beckett Barlow

Hayden Wakefield

Thousands of schools around the country participate in this competition. The school winners, including Barlow, will now take a written test; up to 100 of the top scorers on that test in each state will then be eligible to compete in their state Bee on March 31, 2017. All state champions are then eligible to win the national championship and its first prize, a $50,000 college scholarship, lifetime membership in the National Geographic Society, and a trip to the Galapagos Islands. The national competitions will be held May 15-17 in Washington D.C.

Everyone can test their geography knowledge by downloading the GeoBee Challenge, National Geographic app, with more than 1,000 questions culled from past bees. 

The National Geographic Society is one of the world’s largest nonprofit scientific and educational organizations.  The Society has been inspiring people to care about the planet since 1888.