Section I – Instruction

Contents

Advanced College Placement – IHCD

It is the belief of the Board that any student who is capable of, and wishes to do, college-level work while in high school should be permitted to do so and given assistance in enrolling in advanced courses.

Advanced placement courses offered by the school system shall depend upon a sufficient number of students desiring the particular course and qualifying for it, and upon the availability of a staff member qualified to teach it.

Any high school student whose admission to a college-level course or courses is recommended by his/her counselor may enroll in a nearby college and be released from high school attendance for such hours as are required for the college course(s).  If the student wishes to receive high school credit for the course, he/she may request permission from his/her Principal, through the counselor, to apply the course toward high school graduation requirements.

A student accepted for full-time early admission to college (that is before graduating from high school) shall be granted a high school diploma upon evidence that he/she has completed the academic work required, and said diploma will be presented at the regular commencement of his/her class.

Cross Reference:   IHCDA – Post-Secondary Enrollment Options

Policy Adopted:    November 19, 1975

 

Policy Revised:     May 7, 1980, May 17, 1995, April 3, 2002 and October 19, 2011

 

Policy Reviewed: December 5, 2011

 

Child Find – IHBAC

 

M.S.A.D. #35 seeks to ensure that all children within its jurisdiction who are school-age, 5 through the school year in which they turn 20, and who are in need of special education and supportive assistance, including homeless children, state wards, state agency clients, students who have been suspended or expelled, children attending private schools receiving home instruction, children incarcerated in county jails, children who have the equivalent of 10 full days of unexcused absences or 7 consecutive school days of unexcused absences during a school year, highly mobile children (including migrant or homeless), and children who are suspected of being disabled and in need of special education and supportive assistance even though they are advancing from grade to grade are identified, located, and evaluated.

M.S.A.D. #35’s child find responsibility shall be accomplished through a unit-wide process which, while not a definitive or final judgment of a student’s capabilities or disability, is a possible indicator of special education needs.  Final identification of students with disabilities and programming for such students occurs only after an appropriate evaluation and a determination by the IEP Team.

This child find process shall include obtaining data on each child through multiple measures, direct assessment, and parent information regarding the child’s academic and functional performance, gross and fine motor skills, receptive and expressive language skills, vision, hearing and cognitive skills.  M.S.A.D. #35 may schedule child find activities during its annual kindergarten enrollment to assist in planning for necessary special education and related service at the start of the school year.  If screening occurs in the spring prior to school entry, M.S.A.D. #35 will refer the child to the regional Child Development Services (CDS) site within 10 school days.

If the child find process indicates that a student may require special education and supportive services in order to benefit from regular education, the student shall be referred to the IEP Team to determine the student’s eligibility for special education services.

School staff, parents, or agency representatives or other individuals with knowledge of the child may refer children to the IEP team if they believe that the student, because of a disability, may be in need of special education and supportive services in order to benefit from regular education.  Such a referral should follow the school unit’s pre-referral and referral policy.

Legal Reference:   34 C.F.R. § 300.111 (2006) Ch. 101§ IV(2) (2007) (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Policy Adopted: April 1, 1987

 

Policy Revised: December 6, 1989, May 1, 1996, January 8, 2003, December 1, 2004 and November 17, 2010

 

Class Size – IIB

The M.S.A.D. #35 Board of Directors is committed to maintaining class sizes that are consistent with Department of Education regulations.  Further, the Board believes that there is a relationship between class size and pupil achievement that varies across grade levels.

While recognizing constraints placed upon the system by transfer of students, staff levels, and the physical plant, the Board is committed to the following class size guidelines.

Grade Level                       Class Size Range

        PreK – 1                                     14-18

        2 – 5                                           18-22

        6 – 8*                                         18-25

        9 – 12*                                       15-25

Higher class sizes are allowed for instrumental and choral music, physical education, and other special class arrangements such as lectures and special short term presentations.

Special education classes are to be in compliance with Special Education teacher-student ratios established by State rules or regulations.

In the event that class sizes fall outside of the upper or lower limit of the range by two or more students, the principal shall consult with the Superintendent who will make a recommendation to the Board for its consideration.

Policy Adopted: April 1, 1987

 

Policy Revised: September 18, 1996, October 18, 2006 and May 4, 2011

 

Policy Reviewed: December 5, 2011

Curriculum Development and Adoption – IGA

 

Curriculum is defined as a written document that sets forth the learning expectations for all students for all content areas.  The curriculum shall reflect continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

The Board recognizes that curriculum development, review and evaluation is an ongoing process and that programs and practices may need to be adjusted or revised to meet educational standards and to serve the best interests of students and the community.

Therefore:

  1. The Board expects the administration and staff to be sensitive to changing conditions that may require modifications in curriculum.

  1. The Board expects all programs to be subject to ongoing review and evaluation to ensure that they meet the instructional needs of students.

  1. The Board expects the school system to undertake intensive curriculum revision as needed.

  1. The Curriculum Director is expected to lead the ongoing curriculum development and review process, and in aligning curriculum with educational standards and with advances in knowledge, educational research and “best practices.”

  1. The Board expects that curriculum development and revision will be achieved with appropriate involvement of administrators, instructional and support staff, students, parents, community and the Board.

  1. The Board shall review and adopt all curriculum guides, course descriptions and courses of study prior to their implementation.

The Curriculum Director is expected to develop plans and timelines as necessary for the development, implementation and evaluation of the curriculum and to provide the Board with an annual report on the status of the curriculum.

The Curriculum Director, under the supervision of the Superintendent, is expected to make recommendations concerning professional development, instructional materials and resources needed for curriculum implementation, consistent with Board policy.

Legal References: 20-A M.R.S.A. §§ 1001(6), 6209

Ch. 127 § 5-7 (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Cross Reference: IL – Testing Programs

Policy Adopted: January 17, 1979

 

Policy Revised: December 2, 1998, December 19, 2007 and October 20, 2010

 

Curriculum Development – Process for Change Recommendations – IGA-R

The Board’s policy on curriculum development encourages the participation of instructional staff.  In order to provide a consistent method for consideration of suggestions for curriculum change initiated by staff, the Board endorses the following procedure.

For the purpose of this procedure, “curriculum” means the school unit’s written document that includes the learning expectations for all students for all content areas.  The curriculum shall reflect continuous, sequential and specific instruction.

It is intended that this procedure apply to suggestions for significant changes in the District’s syllabus/instructional program outline.

  1. Suggestions for curriculum changes shall be submitted in writing, to the building principal.

  1. The building principal may invite administrators and instructional staff from the school and/or District and, as appropriate, parents and students, to discuss the proposed change.

  1. Following consideration of the proposed change, the building principal may forward to the Curriculum Director a recommendation accompanied by the following data:

  1. Summary of the recommended change;

  2. Rationale for the recommended change;

  3. Details of the recommended change;

  4. Summary of discussions/consideration at the building principal level;

  5. Statement concerning the anticipated effect on other aspects of the curriculum; and

  6. An estimate of the anticipated cost to the District, supported by a list of resources required should the change be adopted, including but not limited to staffing requirements, space, materials and supplies.

  1. The Curriculum Director, after consulting with the District’s administrative team, will forward a recommendation to the Superintendent.

  1. Following consideration of the Curriculum Director’s recommendation, the Superintendent will make his/her own recommendation to the Curriculum Committee.

  1. The committee may invite input from parents, students and the community.

  1. The Board will act on the Curriculum Committee’s recommendation.

Policy Adopted: October 20, 2010

Educational Research:  Student Submission To Surveys, Analyses, or Evaluations – ILD

In this policy, “surveys, analyses, or evaluations” refer to methods of gathering data for research purposes.

No student shall be required as part of any program wholly or partially funded by the U.S. Department of Education or created by a third party to submit to any survey, analyses, or evaluation that reveals information concerning:

  1. Political affiliations or beliefs of the student or the student’s parent;

  1. Mental or psychological problems of the student or the student’s family;

  1. Sex behavior or attitudes;

  1. Illegal, antisocial, self-incriminating, or demeaning behavior;

  1. Critical appraisals of other individuals with whom respondents have close family relationships;

  1. Legally recognized privileged or analogous relationships, such as those of lawyers, physicians, and ministers;

  1. Religious practices, affiliations, or beliefs of the student or student’s parents; or

  1. Income (other than that required by law to determine eligibility for participation in a program or for receiving financial assistance under such program ).

All instructional materials, including teachers’ manuals, films, tapes, or other supplementary material which will be used in connection with any such survey, analysis, or evaluation shall be available upon request for inspection by the student’s parent/guardian.  For the purpose of this policy, “instructional material” does not include academic tests or assessments.

A parent may inspect, upon request, a survey created by a third party before the survey is administered or distributed to a student.

The Superintendent/designee will be responsible for implementing any procedures necessary to protect the privacy of participating students and to provide parents with access to surveys within a reasonable time before administration or distribution.

MSAD #35 will notify parents of this policy at least annually at the beginning of the school year and within a reasonable time of any substantive change in policy.  Insofar as practicable, MSAD #35 will also notify parents directly at the beginning of the school year when surveys, analyses, or evaluations are scheduled or anticipated.  Parents may elect not to have their child  participate in  any survey, analysis, or evaluation.  Students who are 18 years of age or older may elect not to participate in such surveys, analyses, or evaluations.

Legal reference:  20 U.S.C. § 1232(h)

 

Cross reference:  JRA—Student Educational Records

 

Policy Adopted:  September 17, 2003

Exemption from Required Instruction – IMBB

The curriculum of MSAD #35 is designed to reflect the learning expectations for all students in all content areas of the system of Learning Results, as well as other statutory and regulatory requirements and content areas specified by the Board.

The Board acknowledges that from time to time individual students may be exposed to some ideas and materials with which they or their parent(s)/legal guardian disagree.  Students and their parent(s)/legal guardian cannot be required to adopt ideas with which they disagree, but such disagreement alone is not a sufficient basis to exempt a student from the prescribed curriculum.  Exemptions from the required curriculum should be minimized because they can detract from the overall instruction provided to the class as a whole and the educational objectives sought to be achieved by the curriculum.

The Board recognizes, however, that there could be topics in the curriculum which may be objectionable to individual students and/or parent(s)/legal guardian based on their particular sincerely held religious, moral or philosophical beliefs.  Exemption from instruction which infringes on such beliefs may be requested by the parent(s)/legal guardian.

Requests for exemption from instruction must be made in writing to the building Principal and are subject to the approval of the Principal.  The Principal shall notify the Superintendent as soon as practicable of any request for exemption from instruction and of his/her decision.   If the Principal denies an exemption request, the parent(s)/legal guardian may appeal to the Superintendent.

In considering requests for exemption, factors that the Principal should consider may include:

  1. The alignment of the curriculum with the system of Learning Results;

 

  1. Whether the course or content area is required by state law or Board policy;

 

  1. The educational importance of the material or instruction from which exemption is requested;

 

  1. Evidence regarding the sincerity of the belief on which the request is based;

 

  1. Whether the school has a legal obligation to accommodate the exemption request;

 

  1. The effect of exemption or accommodation on the validity of the local assessment system; and

 

  1. Other factors that bear upon the particular request.

Exemption from required instruction does not excuse the student from meeting the requirements of the Learning Results or from total credit hours or other requirements for graduation, or from performing alternative work.

When the Principal determines that the curriculum that has been aligned with the system of Learning Results conflicts with sincerely held religious beliefs of a student or his/her parent or legal guardian, reasonable accommodation in the curriculum shall be made for the student, within the scope of existing resources.  Alternative instruction may be provided by the school or through approved independent study.  Any alternative instruction shall be approved in advance by the Principal in consultation with appropriate instructional staff and shall meet the standards and objectives of the part of the curriculum that is being replaced.  When requests for exemption from required curriculum are made for religious reasons, a parent/guardian who is dissatisfied with the Principal’s decision may appeal to the Superintendent.  If the accommodation in the curriculum that is requested is so great that the validity of the local assessment system is compromised, the Superintendent will determine how to address the situation, subject to the approval of the Commissioner.

When a student is exempted from any portion of the regular curriculum for other than religious reasons (exemption based on sincere philosophical or moral beliefs), the staff will make reasonable efforts, within the scope of existing resources, to accommodate alternative instruction for the student.  Alternative instruction may be provided by the school or through approved independent study.  Any alternative instruction shall be approved in advance by the Principal in consultation with the classroom teacher, and shall meet the standards and objectives of the part of the curriculum that is being replaced. When requests for exemption are made for philosophical or moral reasons, a parent/guardian who is dissatisfied with the Principal’s decision may appeal to the Superintendent, whose decision shall be final. Local boards may wish to consider adding an appeal to the Board in the event that a parent/guardian is dissatisfied with the Superintendent’s decision.

Legal References: 20-A MRSA § 6209

LD 1536, Chap. 51 Resolves

Ch.. 127 § 3.07 (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Ch. 131 (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Cross References: ADF – School District Commitment to Learning Results

IJJ – Instructional and Library Material Selection

IMB – Teaching About Controversial/Sensitive Issues

IMBAA – Alternatives To Biological Dissection

Policy Adopted: March 1, 2006

Field Trips and Excursions – IJOA

The Board recognizes the educational value of school-sponsored trips as a means of extending the curriculum and as a vehicle for encouraging and supporting student participation in academic, artistic and athletic competitions.

School-Sponsored Trips

School-sponsored trips include field trips, competition trips, and school-sponsored excursions.  The Superintendent and Board must approve, in advance, all school-sponsored overnight foreign trips.

Field Trips

“Field trip” means a trip that takes place during the school day and is organized and conducted by an MSAD 35 employee as a means of accomplishing particular curriculum objectives.  To be educationally beneficial, a field trip requires thoughtful selection, careful advance planning, and opportunities for students to assimilate the experience during and at the conclusion of the trip.  All students within the class or grade will be eligible to participate.

Field trips must be approved in advance by the building principal.

Teachers and principals will be expected to consider the following factors in planning and approval of field trips:

  1. Objectives of the proposed trip and the anticipated learning outcomes;

 

  1. Specific learning activities to be experienced during the trip;

 

  1. Suitability of the activity and distance traveled to the age of students;

 

  1. Mode and availability of transportation;

 

  1. Arrangements for meals (if applicable);

 

  1. Availability of funding through the school budget or other appropriate sources.

In addition the Board requires that:

  1. Parents/guardians give written permission for field trip participation;

 

  1. Students and parents may be responsible only for minimal incidental expenses;

 

  1. School bus transportation be used when arrangements can be made to do so without disrupting regular school bus schedules;

 

  1. Adequate supervision be provided to maintain discipline and safety and to respond to emergencies; and

 

  1. Students participating in field trips conduct themselves in a manner consistent with Board policies and school rules.

Competition Trips

“Competition trip” means any trip related to an academic, artistic, athletic, or other student competition or performance that involves individual students or teams.  The Board recognizes that some competition trips are earned through success in qualifying events and do not lend themselves to advance planning.  Any competition trip that is outside of those scheduled for the year must be approved in advance by the Superintendent and Board.  Approval may be contingent upon availability of funding through the school budget or other sources.

School-Sponsored Excursions

“School-sponsored excursions” are trips that are organized and conducted by an employee of MSAD 35 as a non-essential supplement to the curriculum, a class social activity, or an activity planned by a student club or organization.  Such trips may include overnight, long-distance in-state or out-of-state travel, or foreign travel.

The Superintendent and Board must approve, in advance, any excursions involving all overnight and foreign trips.  Same-day short-distance excursions must be approved by the building administrator.

Staff or administrators seeking approval for school-sponsored excursions must furnish the following information:

 

  1. Objectives of the trip and anticipated outcomes;

  2. Specific learning activities to be experienced;

  3. Number and grade(s) of students;

  4. Criteria for selecting students;

  5. Maximum number of students who may participate;

  6. Cost per student, including funds requested from District and from individual students;

  7. Fundraising plans (if applicable);

  8. Transportation arrangements;

  9. Itinerary;

  10. Arrangements for meals and lodging;

  11. Adequate supervision must be provided to maintain discipline and safety and to respond to emergencies;

  12. Plans for safety and emergencies;

  13. Plans for communicating information to parents and obtaining parental permission; and

  14. Accountability for student conduct.

  15. Parents may arrange transportation for their own children to and from school sponsored events within the district with the approval of the school administrator.

Students participating in field trips conduct themselves in a manner consistent with Board policies and school rules.  Students who violate Board policy or school rules will be subject to disciplinary consequences.

Non-School-Sponsored Trips and Excursions

Travel that is not an extension of the instructional program and has not been approved as a school-sponsored trip by the Superintendent or Board in compliance with this policy will be considered a non-sanctioned trip or excursion.

Non-school-sponsored trips are any trips or excursions organized by District employees, parents, students, non-school groups, community members, or others acting independently of the schools.  These trips involve students on a voluntary

and self-supporting basis, are not approved by the Board, and are not part of or associated with the curriculum, co-curricular, or extracurricular activities.

All responsibility for non-sanctioned trips and excursions lies with the individual(s) or group(s) organizing them.   The Board accepts no responsibility for non-school-sponsored trips or excursions, and organizers should be aware that such trips or excursions are not covered by the District’s liability insurance.

To minimize the impact of these trips on the instructional program and operation of the schools, the trip must be scheduled for non-school days.

Instructional time may not be used to promote the trip or distribute materials.  Individuals or groups who wish to use the schools for the purpose of publicizing trips or recruiting participants may do so in accordance with the Board’s facilities use policy.  Individuals or groups wishing to distribute promotional materials may do so only in accordance with Board policy.  Non-school-sponsored trips and excursions must not be represented as school functions or as related to, or an extension of, the District’s instructional, co-curricular or extracurricular programs.

While private activities of staff cannot be regulated by the school, it is the responsibility of any staff engaging in such trips or activities to notify the parents of the participating students that this is not a school activity, but a private volunteer excursion undertaken by that teacher or staff member.

Cross References: EEAG – Use of Private Vehicles or School Buses

KHC – Distribution/Posting of Non-School Materials

Policy Adopted: October 7, 1970

 

Policy Revised: November 4, 1992, November 10, 1993, November 19, 1996, August 15, 2001, November 17, 2004 and April 25, 2012

Gifted and Talented Education – IHBB

Philosophy

The Board recognizes the importance of identifying students of unusual ability in the following areas:  general intelligence, academic aptitude, creative thinking,  or visual and performing arts.  Identification instruments, selection criteria and procedures will ensure that participants are of gifted intellect or are talented performers or both.

Programs will be designed to meet the needs of individual students in the context of existing educational programs in order to provide the least restrictive educational environment while maintaining social relationships and social development.

Goals

To provide talented and gifted children with:

        A.     An opportunity for challenge of their intellectual abilities;

        B.     An outlet to develop their creative thinking;

        C.     Experiences designed to nurture leadership ability;

        D.     A means to expand their academic achievements; and

        E.      An opportunity to express their artistic and performing arts talents.

 

Legal Reference:   20-A MRSA § 8101

Policy Adopted: April 16, 2008

 

Policy Revised: November 17, 2010

Graduation Requirements – IKF

With the implementation of the federal No Child Left Behind (NCLB) legislation, Maine’s Learning Results, and heightened community expectations for student learning, the Board of Directors recognizes the need to establish minimum standards for the awarding of a Marshwood High School diploma that are consistent with these State and Federal laws and regulations and with community educational values and expectations.

Before entering high school, students need to know the standards for attaining a high school diploma in order to plan an appropriate, sequential, educational program to meet that goal.

The Superintendent, through the high school principal, shall be responsible for making accurate information concerning diploma requirements available to incoming students and their parents prior to the start of their ninth grade year or at anytime there is a change in graduation requirements affecting current students. This policy will be included in the high school student handbook.

The Board has approved this schedule of minimum requirements for graduation.

  1. Graduation Requirements (one year of study = one credit)

  1. The student must successfully complete a total of 21 credits including the 12 ½ (twelve and one-half) credits specified by Maine law.

  1. Subjects required by Maine law, Title 20-A, Subchapter 3, sections 4722 and 4723, are as follows:

  1. English – 4 years;

  2. Mathematics – 2 years;

  3. Social Studies/History – including American history and government – 2 years;

  4. Science – including at least one year of laboratory study – 2 years;

  5. Fine arts, which may include art, music, forensics, or drama – one year;

  6. Health -1/2 year; and

  7. Physical Education – one year.

3.       Additional Local Requirements

  1. Additional Math – one year;

  2. Additional Science -one year

  3. Additional Social Studies/History to include World   History and American Citizen – one year;

  4. Citizenship/Community Service-50 hours

  5. The remaining required credits for graduation may be selected by the student based upon the student’s interests, abilities, and the requirements of the field that the student plans to enter upon graduation. Under certain circumstances a maximum of two elective credits may be obtained from outside of Marshwood High School and may include courses offered by other schools, colleges, Adult Education, correspondence or through Independent Study.

D.     Other Local Considerations

  1. Students may obtain credits through studies at the Marshwood Adult Education Program. The approval of the Director of Adult Education, Guidance Counselor, Department Chair and the Principal will be required.

  1. Credits may be obtained in summer school in classes which students completed but did not pass at Marshwood High School. Approval must be obtained from the Guidance Counselor, Department Chair and Principal.

  1. Credits may be obtained through correspondence courses from an accredited correspondence school provided prior approval is obtained from the Department Chair, Guidance Counselor and Principal. Progress must be monitored by a member of the high school staff. Only one can be a required course.

  1. Advanced or enrichment courses may be taken at approved colleges or universities or any other secondary schools when the course is not available at Marshwood High School. Approval of the Guidance Counselor and Principal is required.

  1. Independent Study Programs are available where work with a teacher or community resource person is desirable. Forms for this program are available through the Guidance Office. The approval of the Department Chair, Guidance Counselor and Principal are required and the process must be monitored by a teacher of the subject area involved.

II.    Additional Considerations Applicable to the awarding of a Marshwood High School Diploma

  1. Transfer Students: For students who transfer to Marshwood High School from another state or from an educational program that is not required to meet the content standards of the Maine Learning Results, the Marshwood High School principal shall determine the value of the student’s prior educational experience towards achieving the standards in a manner consistent with State law and applicable Board policies.

  1. Early Awarding of Diplomas: A student who has met the State’s and the Board’s diploma requirements in fewer than four years of high school may be awarded a diploma. A student must obtain approval from the principal in advance of a decision to graduate early.

  1. Delayed Awarding of Diplomas: At the Superintendent’s discretion, a student who leaves Marshwood High School to attend an accredited, degree-granting institution of higher education may, upon satisfactory completion of the freshman year, be awarded a high school diploma when they have met all graduation requirements.

  1. Extended Study: Students are eligible for extended years of study to complete the requirement of a diploma if they have not reached the age of 20 at the start of the school year. Students eligible for extended years of study may be referred to adult education or other resources suitable to young adult learners.

  1. Extended study for students with disabilities shall be specified in the student’s Individualized Education Plan.

  1. Participation in Graduation ceremony: A student must complete all requirements for a high school diploma in order to participate in graduation exercises.

Legal References: 20-A M.R.S.A. § 4722

Ch.127 § 7 (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Cross References: IKFA Early Graduation

ILA Testing and Assessment of Students (Local Assessment System)

IKF Participation in Graduation

Policy Revised: October 7, 1998, August 25, 2004 and February 25, 2009

Guest Speakers in Schools –  IMC

 

The Board encourages school administrators and teachers to invite guest speakers when the speaker’s program supports or supplements the curriculum and provides a learning experience appropriate to the grade level(s) of students.

The Board believes that it is important for students to have access to information, to appreciate the knowledge, experience and accomplishments of others, to be exposed to issues upon which there may be disagreement, and to learn to discriminate between facts and opinion, analyze and discuss different points of view and draw their own conclusions.

Speakers in the Classroom

Because guest speakers may have particular viewpoints and opinions, it is important that teachers have a clear understanding of the speaker’s purpose, prepare students for the experience in advance and provide appropriate follow-up activities.  Teachers should strive to provide a balance of viewpoints and opinions through discussion or other activities that allow for the presentation of opposing views.  This may include, when practicable, the invitation of speakers with different points of view.

Teachers are expected to use professional judgment in determining the appropriateness of an issue to the curriculum and/or the maturity of students.  When unsure, the teacher should consult with the building principal.

A staff member who wishes to invite a speaker must obtain the approval of the building principal before doing so.  Requests for speakers must be submitted at least one week in advance.  A staff member whose request has been denied may appeal to the Superintendent, whose decision shall be final.

Teachers should notify parents in advance if a speaker’s presentation may be controversial.

The teacher who has invited the speaker remains responsible for the supervision of students and must be present at all times when the speaker is in the classroom.

Speakers at School Assemblies

Principals may invite or approve speakers for school assemblies when the experience is consistent with the objectives of this policy.  Non-routine assemblies should be scheduled in a way that minimizes interruption of the instructional program.

Whenever practicable, staff should be given advance notice of such assemblies at least two (2) days in advance.

Speaker Guidelines

 

The Superintendent/designee may develop rules or guidelines for speaker conduct and decorum.

 

Profanity, vulgarity and the advocacy of violence, violation of the law, Board policies or school rules or promotion of use of tobacco, drugs or alcohol or other substances or items that are illegal for minors will not be permitted.

 

Cross Reference: IMB – Teaching About Controversial/Sensitive Issues

IMBAA – Exemption From Required Instruction

Policy Adopted:  July 17, 2013

 

Guidelines Governing the Publishing of Student Information

on the M.S.A.D. #35 Website – IJNDC-E

 

M.S.A.D. #35 maintains an official website to provide general information about the school system as well as information about educational programs, extracurricular activities, school events, and student and staff achievements.

Maine law requires public schools to obtain written approval from parents/guardians prior to publishing personal information about students on the Internet. This form will authorize M.S.A.D. #35 to publish the following:

A.      Full names of students in connection with class rosters, honor rolls, awards received, and team/extracurricular activity participant lists.

B.      Group and/or individual photographs of students.

C.      Individual student or class work may be published on M.S.A.D. #35’s website from time to time in accordance with established guidelines. Such work may include creative writing, research projects, art work, music, performances, and audiovisual presentations. All student work will include a copyright notice prohibiting the copying of such work without express written permission. Copies of the Board’s Website Policy and Guidelines are available at the Superintendent’s Office or on M.S.A.D. #35’s website at www.msad35.net.

Cross References: GCSA/GCSA-R – Employee Computer and Internet Use/Rules

IJNDB/IJNDB-R – Student Computer and Internet Use/Rules

IJNDC – Website/Website Pages

IJNDC-R – M.S.A.D. #35 Website Guidelines

Policy Adopted: June 19, 2002

 

Policy Revised: June 7, 2006 and February 1, 2012

Home Schooling – IHBG

Parents/guardians who wish to have their children fulfill the compulsory school attendance law through equivalent education by home schooling must comply with the provisions of 20-A MRSA § 5001-A(3)(A)(4).

  1. The student’s parent/guardian must provide a written notice of intent to provide home instruction simultaneously to the Superintendent of the school unit in which the student resides and to the Commissioner of the Department of Education within ten calendar days of the beginning of home instruction.  The notice must contain the following information:

  1. The name, signature and address of the student’s parent/guardian;

  2. The name and age of the student;

  3. The date the home instruction program will begin;

  4. A statement of assurance that indicates the home instruction program will provide at least 175 days annually of instruction and will provide instruction in:  English and language arts, math, science, social studies, physical education, health education, library skills, fine arts, and, in at least one grade from grade 6 to 12, Maine studies.  At one grade level from grade 7 to 12, the student will demonstrate proficiency in the use of computers; and

  5. A statement of assurance that indicates that the home instruction program will include an annual assessment of the student’s academic progress that includes at least one of the forms of assessment described in 20-A MRSA § 5001-A(3)(A)(4)(b) and paragraph B below.

  1. On or before September 1 of each subsequent year of home instruction, the student’s parent/guardian must file a letter with the Superintendent of the administrative unit in which the student resides and to the Commissioner stating the intention to continue providing home instruction and enclose a copy of one of the following forms of annual assessment of the student’s academic progress:

  1. A standardized achievement test administered through the administrative unit in which the student resides or through other arrangements approved by the Commissioner.  If the test is administered through the administrative unit in which the student resides, that administration must be agreed to by the Superintendent of the administrative unit prior to submission of the written notice of intent to provide home instruction;

 

  1. A test developed by the Superintendent/designee of the administrative unit in which the student resides appropriate to the student’s home instruction program, which must be agreed to by the Superintendent of the administrative unit prior to submission of the written notice of intent to provide home instruction;

 

  1. A review and acceptance of the student’s progress by an identified individual who holds a current Maine teacher’s certificate;

 

  1. A review and acceptance of the student’s progress based on, but not limited to, a presentation of an educational portfolio of the student to a local area home schooling support group whose membership for this purpose includes a currently certified Maine teacher or administrator; or

 

  1. A review and acceptance of the student’s progress by a local advisory board selected by the Superintendent of the administrative unit in which the student resides that includes one administrative unit employee and two home instruction tutors.  A “home instruction tutor” means the parent/guardian or other person who acts or will act as a primary teacher of the student in the home instruction program.  This provision must be agreed to by the Superintendent of the administrative unit in which the student resides prior to submission of the written notice of intent to provide home instruction.

The Superintendent shall maintain a roster of all students eligible to attend school within the school unit who are receiving equivalent instruction, as provided in Department of Education rules.

 

Legal References: 20-A MRSA§ 5001-A

Ch. 125 § 12.02, Ch. 130 (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Cross References:  JEA – Compulsory School Attendance

IHBGA – Home Schooling—Participation in School Programs

IHBGB – Special Education Services for Students in Private Schools or Home Schooling

JGAB – Assignment of Students to Classes: Transfer Students and Home-Schooling Students

Policy Adopted:    January 5, 2011

 

Policy Reviewed: December 5, 2011

Home Schooling – Participation in School Programs – IHBGA

The Board acknowledges the provisions for equivalent instruction under Maine law.  The Board further recognizes the Legislature’s statement “that the term ‘equivalent’ is intended to mean meeting state standards for alternate or other instruction and is not intended to mean the same as the education delivered in the public school system.”

In addition, it is the intention of the Board to, “cooperate in the home instruction of any child who resides in the school administrative unit to the degree that the level of cooperation does not interfere with the responsibilities to the students enrolled in M.S.A.D. #35’s regular programs.”  Furthermore, participation of students in such school programs shall be limited to home-schooled students whose home instruction programs are in compliance with applicable Maine law and Department of Education regulations.

In order to maintain an efficient and orderly school program, the Board directs the Superintendent/designee to develop procedures, as appropriate, regarding the availability of school system resources and services to home-schooled students who would otherwise be eligible to attend school in M.S.A.D. #35.  The procedures shall be in accord with the following provisions.

I.       Provision of Information

At the request of the student or the student’s parent/guardian, this school unit shall make available to home-schooled students, in a form determined by the school, information regarding access to public school activities and attendance at the school unit’s schools.  This information must include:

  1. Requirements regarding initial health and developmental screening for motor skills, vision, hearing, and immunization; and

  1. Criteria for participation of home-schooled students in curricular, co-curricular, and extracurricular activities.

II.      Permitted Participation

  1. Participation in Regular Classes.  Home instruction students may enroll in specific, day-school classes provided that the student’s attendance is regular, the class is deemed to be age and grade appropriate, and all prerequisite course requirements are met.  In addition, the following shall also apply.

  1. The student or the student’s parent/guardian, on the student’s behalf, shall apply in writing to and receive written approval from the Superintendent/designee.  Approval may not be unreasonably withheld.

 

  1. The student shall demonstrate prior satisfactory academic achievement consistent with school unit policy and procedures applicable to all students.

 

  1. The student shall comply with behavioral, disciplinary, attendance and other classroom rules applicable to all students.  If a student fails to comply, the school may withhold credit or terminate the student’s participation.

 

  1. Transportation must be provided by the parent/guardian or student.  However, the student may use the same transportation as all other students in the school unit as long as additional expenses are not incurred and vehicle capacity is not exceeded.

 

  1. The student shall complete all assignments and tests as required of all students in the same class.

  1. Course Auditing.  Home instruction students may audit a course(s) provided the following conditions have been met.

  1. The student or the student’s parent/guardian, on behalf of the student, shall apply in writing to and receive written approval from the Superintendent/designee to audit a specific course or courses.  Participation may not be unreasonably withheld.

 

  1. The student agrees to meet established behavioral, disciplinary, attendance and other classroom rules applicable to all students.  If a student fails to comply, the school may terminate participation.

III.    Special Education Services

        Special education services will be available to eligible special education students in accordance with applicable federal and state laws and regulations.

IV.    Admission to Regular Program/Placement

A student who has been receiving home-school instruction and who seeks admission to the regular school program will be placed in a grade commensurate with the level of the student’s academic achievement.  Placement must be guided by the following.

  1. For students who transfer into school from an educational program that is not required to meet the standards of the system of Learning Results, the principal of the receiving school shall determine the value of the student’s prior educational experience toward meeting these standards.

  1. Appropriate school staff may make recommendations concerning placement based on, but not limited to, factors such as the student’s completed curricula and record of achievement, conferences with the student’s parent/guardian, and administration of tests.

  1. The final grade placement decision shall be made by the principal.  The principal’s decision may be appealed to the Superintendent, whose decision shall be final.

V.     Re-Admission to the School Program

Placement of home-schooled students who wish to be readmitted to the school program will be determined by the principal who shall consult with members of the professional staff to the extent appropriate and, as deemed necessary, to make a reasonable determination that the requisite academic standards have been met, and collect from parents actual samples of coursework (e.g., homework, papers, examinations).  The principal may also direct that a test or tests be administered to help determine the student’s progress toward meeting the content standards of the Learning Results for the purpose of determining an appropriate grade level.  The decision of the principal may be appealed to the Superintendent.

VI.    Use of School Textbooks and Library Books

Subject to availability, a student receiving home instruction may use school textbooks, if the number of particular copies is sufficient, and library books owned by the school unit, subject to the following conditions.

  1. The use does not disrupt regular student, staff or special program functions.

  1. The student’s sign-out period for a library book is the same as that applicable to regularly enrolled students.

 

  1. The student may sign out a textbook for a period not to exceed one school year.

 

  1. The parent/guardian and student agree to reimburse the school unit for lost, unreturned or damaged library books and textbooks and for consumable supplies used.

VII.   Use of School Facilities and Equipment

A student receiving home-school instruction may use public school facilities and equipment on the same basis as regularly enrolled students if the following conditions are met.

  1. The use does not disrupt regular school activities.

 

  1. The use is approved by the school principal in accordance with established school policy.

 

  1. The use does not create additional expense to the school unit.

 

  1. The use is directly related to the student’s academic program.

 

  1. The use of potentially hazardous areas, such as shops, laboratories, and gymnasiums, is supervised by a qualified employee of the school unit, approved and assigned by the Superintendent.

VIII. State Assessment Program

If a parent of a student in an equivalent instruction program requests to have the student participate in the State Assessment Program, such request must be granted.  Participation in such examinations must be in compliance with all rules and procedures governing testing conditions in the school unit.

IX.    Academic Credit

A student receiving home-school instruction must receive academic credit subject to the following requirements.

  1. Academic credit for individual district courses must be awarded if the student meets required academic standards applicable to all students enrolled in the same course.

 

  1. Academic credit must be awarded for successful completion of alternative instruction opportunities sponsored by the district and available to all students.

X.     High School Course Credits and Diploma Eligibility

The following standards govern the awarding of course credits and a graduation diploma to a student receiving home-school instruction who seeks admission or readmission to the high school.

  1. A student shall earn high school credits for satisfactory completion of courses in the high school pursuant to 20-A MRSA § 5021(2)(A).

  1. A student may earn credit for course work completed through home-school instruction if the principal determines, both in advance and upon completion of the course, that the course satisfies the requirements for awarding the credit.  The principal may direct that the student undergo a test or tests to assist in making a determination relative to the awarding of credit.

  1. Requests for transfer credit for equivalent instruction completed at non-approved private schools, at private schools that elect not to meet requirements under 20-A MRSA § 2901, or through other equivalent instruction programs must be evaluated on the merits of the documentation provided.  The principal and guidance staff shall conduct these evaluations on request made by the student or the student’s parent/guardian.  The principal may direct that the student undergo a test or tests to assist in making a determination relative to the awarding of credit.

  1. For students who transfer into a secondary school from another state or an educational program that is not required to meet the standards of the system of Learning Results, the principal of the receiving school shall determine the value of the prior educational experience toward meeting the standards through the local assessment system.

  1. Awarding of a high school diploma by the local school is conditioned upon the student’s demonstration of having satisfied all specific course credit and other requirements established by the Board.  The final two years must be spent as a full time student at Marshwood High School as a precondition for the awarding of a Marshwood High School diploma.

XI.    Participation in Co-Curricular Activities

 

Students receiving home-school instruction may participate in co-curricular activities such as field trips, assemblies, and academically-related fairs provided:

  1. Prior written permission is obtained from both the parent/guardian and the principal; and

 

  1. The student has agreed to meet established behavioral, disciplinary, attendance, and other rules applicable to all students.

XII.   Participation in Extracurriculur Activities

Students receiving home-school instruction are eligible to try out for extracurricular activities sponsored by the school unit, provided the student applies in writing and the following requirements are satisfied.

  1. The student agrees to abide by equivalent rules of participation as are applicable to regularly enrolled students participating in the activity and provides evidence that the rules of participation are being met.

  1. The student complies with the same physical examination, immunization, insurance, age, and semester eligibility requirements as regularly enrolled students participating in the activity.  All required documentation must be made available upon request by the school unit.  The school principal is authorized to collect from the student’s parent/guardian actual samples of coursework (e.g., homework, examinations, etc.) as he/she deems necessary in order to make the determination that the necessary academic standards have been met.

 

  1. The student meets equivalent academic standards as those established for regularly enrolled students participating in the activity and provides evidence that the academic standards are being met.

  1. The student abides by the same transportation policy as regularly enrolled students participating in the activity.

XIII. Standards for Participation When Tuition Payment to Another Unit is Required

If and when the school unit does not provide academic instruction for specific grade levels, the following applies for students enrolled in an approved program of equivalent instruction.

  1. Class participation.  The home-schooled student or the student’s parent/guardian shall request authorization from the resident local school unit to apply to another school unit for permission to participate in classes or activities in that other school unit.

 

  1. Tuition payment.  Tuition payments for home-schooled student participation in a local school unit, including attendance at an applied technology center or an applied technology region other than the applicant’s resident district is the responsibility of the home-schooled student, the student’s parent/guardian, or the student’s resident school administrative unit, in accordance with school unit policy.  Participation may not be unreasonably withheld.

 

  1. Participation eligibility.  A tuitioned, home-schooled student is subject to the rules relating to eligibility for participation in co-curricular or extracurricular activities as may apply at the receiving school unit.

 

  1. Interscholastic activities.  A tuitioned, home-schooled student attending classes in more than one receiving school unit is not eligible for participation in interscholastic activities at any local school unit.

XIV. Appeals

Appeals from administration and application of the Board policy are heard by the Board, whose decision is final and binding.  Appeals that question the Board policy compliance with legal requirements must be made to the Commissioner, whose decision is final and binding.

Legal Reference:   20-A MRSA §§ 5001-A(3), 5021-5025

Ch. 127, 130 (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Cross References: IHBG – Home Schooling

IHBGB – Special Education Services for Students in Private Schools or Home Schooling

Policy Adopted:    December 7, 1994

 

Policy Revised:     September 1, 2004 and January 5, 2011

 

Policy Reviewed: December 5, 2011 and January 4, 2012

 

Homework – IKB

The Maine School Administrative District #35 Board of Directors acknowledges that there is a positive correlation between meaningful, purposeful homework and student achievement.  Homework extends learning opportunities beyond the school day, deepens understanding of a subject, and encourages a love of learning.  Homework is an integral part of a teacher’s practice, and as such, needs to be thoughtfully crafted, valued, and weighted.

The purpose of homework is to provide students an opportunity to practice, reinforce and apply previously taught skills, acquire knowledge, and prepare for future lessons. The Board recognizes that an additional benefit of homework is teaching students the value of working independently to complete a task and learning to manage their time.

The Board also recognizes that well designed homework should:

  • Have a clear purpose,

  • Be designed for completion within a reasonable time frame,

  • Be the responsibility of the student (Parents should play a supportive role by encouraging and monitoring students’ efforts, and providing a conducive learning environment),

  • Offer students immediate, specific feedback in order to be effective,

  • Reflect students’ academic needs, learning styles, and abilities.

The amount of homework assigned will gradually increase from grade to grade.  As a child advances through school, it is reasonable to expect that homework will be increased according to the following guidelines:

Kindergarten: No homework;

Grades 1-3: A few minutes in grade 1 to a maximum of 30 minutes in grade 3 for all subjects combined;

Grades 4-5:     A maximum of 60 minutes for all subjects combined;

Grades 6 -8:    A maximum of two hours per night for all subjects combined;

Grades 9-12:   A maximum of three hours per night for all subjects combined.   Students enrolled in AP and Honors classes may exceed a maximum of three hours per night for all subjects combined.

Each school in the district shall provide opportunities and resources for students to complete homework on site.

The Board expects that additional guidelines shall be established at each school in regard to weight of homework assignments on a student’s grade, amount of homework, differentiation of assignments, and consistency.

The average cumulative amount of work required over a weekend should not exceed a regular day’s assignment.  Weekends may be for review, voluntary work, or completion of make-up assignments.

School breaks are intended to be a time that is free from schoolwork for students and staff.  School breaks may be used for review, voluntary work, or completion of make-up assignments.  In the event that there is a critical assignment that students must complete over a school break, teachers must have prior written approval from the building principal.

A copy of this policy shall be included in all school and parent handbooks or otherwise distributed to all students.

Cross Reference: KE Public Concerns and Complaints

Policy Adopted: May 1, 1991

 

Policy Revised: November 3, 1999, February 27, 2008 and March 20, 2013

Independent Educational Evaluations (IEEs) – IHBAI

A parent of a student with disabilities has a right to obtain an independent educational evaluation at public expense if the parent disagrees with an evaluation obtained by MSAD #35.  An “independent educational evaluation” means an evaluation conducted by a qualified examiner who is not employed by MSAD #35.

If a parent requests an independent educational evaluation at public expense to challenge an evaluation obtained by MSAD #35, the school must provide a written response to that request within a reasonable period, not to exceed 30 days of the receipt of the request, and shall, without unnecessary delay, either (1) initiate a hearing with the Maine Department of Education to show that its evaluation is appropriate, or (2) ensure that an independent educational evaluation is provided at public expense, unless MSAD #35 demonstrates in a hearing with the Maine Department of Education that the evaluation obtained by the parent did not meet agency criteria.

If a parent requests an independent educational evaluation at public expense, the public agency may ask for the parent’s reason why he/she objects to MSAD #35’s evaluation.  However, the explanation by the parent may not be required, and MSAD #35, may not unreasonably delay either providing the independent educational evaluation at public expense or initiating a due process hearing to defend MSAD #35’s evaluation.

If the independent evaluation is at public expense, the criteria under which the evaluation is obtained, including the location of the evaluation and the qualifications of the examiner, must be the same as the criteria that MSAD #35 uses when it initiates an evaluation.

MSAD #35 shall provide to the parent, upon request for an independent educational evaluation, information about where an independent educational evaluation may be obtained and information about the school’s criteria applicable to independent educational evaluations at public expense.

If the parent obtains an independent educational evaluation at private expense, the results of the evaluation must be considered by MSAD #35, if that evaluation meets MSAD #35’s criteria for independent educational evaluations, in any decision made with respect to the provision of a free appropriate public education for the child.

If the parent requests an independent evaluation at public expense when the parent does not disagree with an evaluation provided by MSAD #35,, or when the school has not recently provided an evaluation in the area requested, the parent request shall be referred without unnecessary delay to the PET to determine whether the PET should order an evaluation in the area requested.

 

Legal Reference: 34 CFR § 300.502 (March 1999)

Ch. 101 §§ 9.19, 12.5 (Nov. 1999) (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Policy Adopted: December 1, 2004

 

Independent Study – III

 

Independent study coursework is not intended to be used to substitute for graduation requirements. Students wishing to seek learning opportunities beyond or outside of the school’s curriculum may do so through an independent course of study arrangement.

 

All independent study arrangements require approval by the Guidance Counselor, Department Chair and Principal, and must be overseen by a faculty member highly qualified in the content area.  (Note: Faculty members who engage in independent study arrangements with students, do so in good faith, without additional district compensation and with the understanding that they will prioritize all other professional obligations.)  All independent study will be considered an external credit which is limited to two credits per student.  Independent study credits will be included on transcripts as pass/fail unless specified.

 

Independent study may be permitted in the following limited circumstances:

A.      A student who has demonstrated academic responsibility, motivation and can show that independent study will enable them to obtain greater knowledge and/or skills than they would otherwise obtain in a course offered within the Marshwood High School curriculum.

 

B.    Under some circumstances a student who is precluded from taking a course required for graduation because of scheduling conflicts may be considered for a graded independent study.  The grade will be included in the student’s grade point average.

 

For all independent study courses, a contractual agreement between the student and the faculty member must be presented to their guidance counselor detailing the goals of the learning experience, the specified outcomes, assessments, the required time commitment, common meeting times, and desired credit.  The quantity and quality of work expected must be equal to or exceed that which would be expected in a regular class at Marshwood High School.  A student may earn a maximum of one independent study credit in an academic year and may be involved in only one independent study at a time.

 

A student seeking approval for independent study must:

 

A.      Select and consult with a faculty or administrative advisor who agrees to supervise and monitor the proposed independent study;

 

B.      Provide a detailed description of the objectives of the independent study, the means of accomplishing the objectives, and how achievement will be measured;

 

C.     Include a monitoring schedule showing how often the student will meet with the supervising teacher and arrangements for assistance, if needed;

 

D.     Consult with the Guidance Counselor to obtain preliminary approval.

 

E.      Obtain written parental consent;

 

F.      Obtain the written approval of the Department Chair of the subject to which                                the independent study is related; and

 

G.     Obtain written approval from the principal.

 

The student’s participation in independent study will appear on his/her schedule and the independent study will appear on the student’s report card and transcript.

 

Cross Reference: IKF – Graduation Requirements

 

Policy Adopted: January 21, 1981

 

Policy Revised: October 1, 1997; January 4, 2012

 

Instructional Program – Controversial Issues- IMB

 

Policy Statement

As a public institution, SAD #35 schools have a responsibility to provide for the study of controversial issues.  Many areas of study abound with vital issues which should be carefully studied and adequately discussed to develop student abilities in reflective and responsible thinking.  Facing issues without prejudice and withholding judgments until facts have been gathered, considered, and conclusions drawn are valuable student outcomes of a free educational system.  A free exchange of ideas is highly important in democratic living.  Serious consideration of purposeful, carefully planned investigations of controversial issues relating to a course of study is important to the citizenship education of students.

In providing for the study and discussion of such issues, the school system must maintain a non-partisan, neutral position.  Controversial issues shall be presented and discussed in school classrooms.  Such study shall be objective and scholarly, and teachers shall guard against giving their personal opinions until after students have had the opportunity to collect and assemble factual information on the subject, to interpret the data without prejudice, to reconsider assumptions and claims, and to reach personal conclusions.  Students must be encouraged to search after truth as well as to form, express, and justify personal views in controversial issues.

The teacher has the right to express personal views regarding controversial issues which have been previously presented and discussed in class.  Such points of view should be clearly identified as opinions.  The teacher may also express his/her views to generate additional thought and discussion but should identify these opinions and their purposes.

Further, the teacher has the obligation to assist students in achieving a scholarly competence, to teach factual information and concepts upon which truth is based, to help students develop a respect for factual knowledge as the basis for critical thought, to avoid discussion of issues beyond the comprehension and maturity of students, to lead students to recognize that some problems and issues escape solution, and to demonstrate a deep respect for the dignity of each student and his/her right to express opinions without jeopardizing relationships with the teachers of the school.

The attached regulations shall govern teaching of controversial issues in the spirit of the philosophy expressed in this policy.

 

Teaching About Controversial Issues

The teaching of controversial issues requires the recognition of responsibilities:  by the teacher to students, by the principal to the school, and by the school to the community. The teacher does not use the classroom as a personal forum. He/she does not employ the techniques of the demagogue or the propagandist for attention, for control, or simply for color.

Basic Guidelines

The teacher should adhere to the following guidelines:

1.      The issues should be within the framework of the District’s philosophy and program of the subject area.

2.      The principal should be aware of any teaching of controversial issues.

3.      The issues should be within the level of the students’ maturity.

4.      The discussion should contribute significantly to developing the skills of critical thinking and problem-solving.

5.      The presentation should be impartial and objective.

6.      Suitable materials including facts and concepts of all aspects of the issue should be available.

7.      Books and instructional materials requisitioned by SAD #35 which deal with controversial subjects or issues must be approved by the Office of the Superintendent.

In the event that a concern with the teaching of a controversial issue is expressed, the following procedure should be followed:

1.      Discussion with School Principal

a.      A conference will be held with the citizen, teacher and principal in an attempt to resolve the issue and to promote mutual understanding.

b.      The principal will prepare a written report on the results of this conference and submit said report to the Superintendent’s Office.

2.      Appeal

        a.      If the initial conference with the principal is unsatisfactory to the citizen, he/she may submit a written appeal to the Superintendent.

        b.      The Superintendent may refer the complaint to a review committee chaired by the  Assistant Superintendent.  The committee membership is to include the principal and a teacher from the school from which the complaint arose, a representative parent and a representative teacher.

        c.      The reviewing committee shall be charged with the responsibility to meet with those concerned, to examine conflicting views and to prepare a report on the situation.  The report will contain the recommendation of the committee.

        d.      The Superintendent will make a determination about the complaint or issue and forward   the decision to all interested parties.

3.      Final Appeal to the Board of Directors

        a.      If the decision of the Superintendent does not satisfy the citizen expressing the concern,   he/she has the right to appear before the Board of Directors to appeal the issue.

        b.      The Board will review the report of the reviewing committee, the decision of the   Superintendent, the statement of the citizen expressing concern and will make such investigation as they deem necessary.  The Board will make a final determination on the complaint and all parties will receive notification of the result in writing.

Second Challenge

If the same issue is challenged at a future date, the principal and the chairman of the Reviewing Committee will examine the previous decision in the light of additional points of view.  If they find any significant difference in the new challenge, the committee may again review the matter; otherwise, the original decision will stand and a copy will be sent to the complainant explaining that the issue has been previously evaluated.

Policy Adopted: May 17, 1995

 

Policy Revised: April 5, 2006

Instructional and Library-Media Materials Selection – IJJ

The Board is legally responsible for all matters relating to the operation of the schools, including the provision of instructional materials and maintenance of library-media resources that support the school system’s curriculum.

While the Board retains its authority to approve the selection of instructional materials, it recognizes the educational expertise of its professional staff and the need for such staff to be involved in the recommendation of instructional materials. The Board delegates responsibility for the selection of instructional materials and library-media resources to the professionally trained personnel employed by the school system, subject to the criteria and procedures for selection and the Board’s policy on challenged materials as described below.

With the assistance of professional staff, the Assistant Superintendent shall establish a system for the selection of instructional materials, including procedures to establish an orderly process for the review and recommendation of instructional materials. The Assistant Superintendent shall make a recommendation to the Superintendent. The Superintendent shall present a recommendation to the Board after the review process.

It is the expectation of the Board that reports on progress made in aligning instructional materials with curriculum development and evaluation in support of the content standards contained in Maine’s system of Learning Results be timely and reflect the recommendations made.

Each school shall maintain a library-media program that includes books and other print materials, multimedia materials, online Internet resources and information technology that support the curriculum. A certified library-media specialist will be responsible for overseeing the library-media program under the supervision of Assistant Superintendent.

As with instructional materials, the Board delegates responsibility for selection of library-media materials and technology and Internet resources to the school system’s professionally trained staff. These materials are subject to the criteria and procedures for selection and the Board’s policy on challenged materials.

DEFINITIONS

Instructional Materials –   include textbooks and other print materials, software and other electronic materials, online/Internet resources (including access) and supplies and additional materials to support instruction in subject areas and in the implementation of the Maine Learning Results.

Library-media Resources – include books, print materials, online/Internet resources (including access), multimedia materials and information technology that, as part of the library-media program, support the schools system’s curriculum.

OBJECTIVES OF SELECTION

The Board recognizes that it is the primary objective of instructional materials to implement and support the curriculum and of library-media resources to extend and enrich the educational programs of the schools. Quality instructional materials and library-media resources are essential to student learning. In preparing students to meet the content standards of the Maine Learning Results, in supporting the achievement of the school unit’s educational goals and objectives and in providing enrichment opportunities that expand student’s interests and contribute to a desire for lifelong learning, it is the responsibility of the instructional program and the library-media centers of the schools to provide a wide range of materials on all levels of difficulty, with a diversity of appeal and presentation of different points of view.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION

Instructional and library-media materials selected should:

A.    Support achievement of the content standards of the Maine Learning Results;

B.     Support the goals and objectives of the school system’s educational programs;

C.     Enrich the curriculum;

D.    Take into consideration the varied interests, abilities and maturity levels of the students served;

E.     Foster respect and appreciation for cultural diversity and varied opinions:

F.      Give comprehensive, accurate and balanced representation;

G.    Present a balance of opposing sides of controversial issues to enable students to develop a capability for critical analysis;

H.    Stimulate growth in factual knowledge, literary appreciation, aesthetic values and ethical standards;

I.       Provide a background of information that will enable students to make informed decisions in their daily lives; and

J.       Respect the constraints of the school unit’s budget.

In evaluating software, multimedia materials and online/Internet resources, additional factors that should be considered include:

a.       Purpose for use

b.      Content

c.       Format (degree of interactivity or student involvement)

d.      Appropriate use of graphics, sound and animation

e.       Feedback provided

f.       Ease of use

PROCEDURES OF SELECTION

Meeting the needs of the individual schools, based on knowledge of the curriculum and the existing collections of instructional and library-media materials, shall be the highest priority. Basic learning materials, i.e., those that are the predominant instructional materials used by most members of the class, are used for a significant portion of the course or receive major emphasis during a course, or are essential to student achievement of the content standards of the Maine Learning Results are to take priority in the selection process.

An evaluation of the existing collection; consulting reputable, unbiased, professionally prepared selection aids and specialists from all departments and/or grade levels shall occur before recommending the materials for purchase.

Textbooks for content areas particularly sensitive to changes in current thought, theory and understanding i.e., science and social studies, should be reviewed regularly and evaluated for being up to-date. A general rule for a textbook is no older than 7 – 10 years unless supplemental materials are available.

Purchase of non-print materials and multimedia, Internet and technology resources shall be made only after personal evaluation by the librarian/media specialist and/or other appropriate professional staff. Reviewing aids may be used in lieu of personal evaluation.

Multiple copies of outstanding and much-in-demand materials should be purchased as needed. Worn or missing standard items should be replaced periodically. Out-of-date or no longer useful materials should be withdrawn from the collection/circulation.

DONATED MATERIALS

Gift materials shall be evaluated by the same criteria as purchased material. They are to be accepted or rejected by those criteria and in accordance with Board policy on gifts and donations.

PARENTAL AUTHORITY

A student’s parent/guardian may inspect, upon request, any instructional material used as part of the curriculum. The Superintendent will be responsible for developing and implementing procedures for providing access to instructional material within a reasonable time after such a request is made.

The Board recognizes that the final authority as to what materials an individual student will be exposed rest with that student’s parents/guardians. However, at no time will the wishes of one child’s parents to restrict his/her reading or viewing of a particular item infringe on other parents’ rights to permit their children to read or view the same material.

Library-media center materials will not be removed from the collection because of criticism except in accordance with Board policy.

CHALLENGED MATERIALS

Despite the care taken to select materials for student and teacher use and the qualifications of the persons who select the materials, the Board recognizes that objections may be raised by students, parents, school staff or community members. In the event a complaint is made, the following procedures will apply;

A.    The complaint shall be heard first by the person providing the materials in question.

B.     If the complaint is not resolved, the complainant shall be referred to the building Principal and requested to fill out the “Instructional and Library-Media Materials Challenge Form”. A copy of the form will be forwarded to the Superintendent.

C.     The Superintendent shall appoint a committee composed of the following persons to review the complaint:

a.    Principal at the appropriate grade level

b.   Librarian/media specialist

c.    Classroom teacher

d.   Department head from the content area of the challenged materials

e.    Community member

D.    The review committee shall:

a.       Read and examine the materials referred to them

b.      Check general acceptance of materials by reading reviews

c.    Weigh values and faults against each other and form opinions based on the material as a whole and not on passages or portions pulled out of context

d.   Meet to discuss the material and to prepare a written report on it

E.     The report of the committee shall be forwarded to the Superintendent who will inform the complainant of the results.

F.      No materials shall be removed from use until the review committee has made a final decision.

G.    The review committee’s decision may be appealed to the Board. The Board may set aside a portion of a regular meeting or call a special meeting for the purpose of receiving testimony from representatives of the various points of view. The material in question shall be:

a.       Reviewed objectively and in its full content

b.   Evaluated in terms of the needs and interest of students, school, curriculum and community

c.    Considered in the light of differing opinions and

d.   Reviewed in light of the criteria for initial selection and purposed as provided herein

The Board will announce its decision in writing not later than the conclusion of the next regular meeting of the Board following its receipt of said testimony.

Policy Adopted: May 17, 1995

 

Policy Revised: December 19, 2007

 

Policy Reviewed: February 14, 2011

Text Adoption Form

1.      Name, Author, Publisher, Edition number

 

2.      Publisher of text or texts in grades below (or next level course)

3.      Publisher in grade above or next higher level course

4.      Were teachers of grades (course) above and below requested to review the proposed text? Their comments:

5.      Explain how the text fits into the scope and sequence of the material covered.

6.      Estimate the reading level of the proposed text using any standard index of readability.

 

7.      On reverse, explain the reasons for this selection. Include information about the number of other materials reviewed.

 

Challenge of Instructional Materials Form – IJJ-E

Type of Material: ____  Book   ____  Magazine/Periodical   ____ Film   ____Recording

____  Software ____  Other (Please specify)  __________________

Author (if known)  ________________________________________________________

Title  ___________________________________________________________________

Publisher (if known)  ______________________________________________________

Person making complaint:  __________________________________________________

                                            Street

Telephone ____________  Address _________________________ Town ____________

Complainant represents: ___ Him/herself

___ Organization  ________________________

___ Other group _________________________

1.      To what portion of the material do you object?  (Please be specific, cite pages, scenes, etc.) ________________________________________________________

2.      What do you feel might be the negative result of reading/viewing/hearing this material?  __________________________________________________________

3.      For what age group would you recommend this material?  __________

4.      Is there anything good about this material? _______________________________

5.      Did you read/view/hear all of the material? ________ If not, what parts did you read/view/ hear?  ____________________________________________________

6.      Are you aware of the professional reviews/judgment of this material? ______

7.      What do you believe is the theme and/or intention of this material? ____________

8.      What would you like the school to do about this material?

        ___ Do not assign it to my child.

        ___ Do not assign it to any students.

        ___ Withdraw it from the library and/or instructional program.

        ___ Refer it to the Educational Media Review Committee for evaluation.

9.      In its place, what material would you recommend?

____________________________________________ ______________

Signature of Complainant                                                        Date

Policy Adopted: May 17, 1995

 

Policy Reviewed: February 14, 2011

 

Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) – IHBA

 

It shall be the policy of MSAD #35 to maintain a complete individualized education program (IEP) for each student who has been identified with a disability and in need of special education services under state and federal special education laws, and who is in attendance at M.S.A.D. #35 schools.  M.S.A.D. #35 shall develop these IEPs in a manner consistent with the procedural requirements of state and federal special education laws.

Student IEPs shall be reasonably calculated to provide the identified student with educational benefits in the least restrictive educational environment.  The school unit shall ensure that such IEPs are in effect within 30 days of when a student is first identified as in need of special education services, and in effect no later than the beginning of each school year for subsequent IEP’s.  All IEP’s must be reviewed at least annually, as prescribed by state and federal special education laws.

Legal References: 20 USC §§ 1414(d)

34 CFR § 300.320-.328 (2006)

Ch. 101 § IX(3) (August 2007) (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Policy Adopted: October 6, 2004

 

Policy Reviewed: October 20, 2010

LAU Plan –  IGBI

MSAD #35, recognizing its responsibility as articulated by federal and state legislation to ensure equal educational opportunities for language minority students, sets forth this LAU plan.  Through its English as a Second Language (ESL) and Bilingual Education Office, the Maine Department of Education has issued the following guidelines for measuring school districts’ compliance with federal and state law:

 

I. Guidelines

A. School systems must identify all students whose primary language is other than English, who have or may have difficulty performing ordinary class work in English, and who cannot learn or achieve on parity with their English dominant peers.  Such Limited English Proficient (LEP) students must be placed in a specifically designed language support program (Lau guidelines refer to the U.S. Supreme Court case Lau vs. Nichols).

B. Any specially designed support or instructional program shall be consistent with all federal acts and mandates, related federal regulations and court cases as well as Maine State acts, mandates and policies, which relate to the education of limited English National Origin minority students.

C. This instructional program should be based on second language acquisition pedagogy and sound educational practices for meeting the individual needs of LEP students.  The burden of proof is upon the district that the instructional program is designed for a LEP student has clearly developed English language skills in English only instruction at a level substantially equivalent to pupils whose primary language is English.  In addition, teachers in English as a Second Language or bilingual classes must be adequately trained in the appropriate field.

D. School systems which provide English language development programs to Limited English Proficient (LEP) students should reclassify students from Limited English Proficient (LEP) to Fluent English Proficient (FEP) by specific reclassification procedures resulting from state-approved assessments.

E. Consistent with Maine Statute and No Child Left Behind Act, LEP students are held to the same accountability requirements for achievement of Learning Results and of participating in state mandated assessments.  Accommodations or alternative assessments may be required for some LEP students.

II. Philosophical Foundation

Even if state (H.P. 1360-L.D.1877/March, 1990) and federal legislation did not require special consideration of the needs of Limited English Proficient (LEP) students, it is consistent with the goals of MSAD #35 to personalize each child’s education so that educational efforts can be successful and responsive to the child’s needs, abilities and interests.  This school district has a history of evaluating needs and providing educational opportunities which will enable all students to become lifelong learners.  This plan applies to regularly enrolled students in MSAD #35.  It is not intended for all students who have come as guests to the district for a short-term social/cultural experience (such as exchange students) though this plan does not require exclusion of appropriate and reasonable assistance for those students.

III. Terms

A. ESL—English as a Second Language:  Use of special curriculum and services to help students who com from a non-English language background learn English.

B. FEP—Fluent (fully) English Proficient:  students are capable of functioning in an English-only educational environment in the areas of comprehension, speaking, reading and writing skills.

C. ELLP—English Language Learner Plan:  a plan developed for an individual student defining the special language services needed to make a transition from Non-English Proficient (NEP) to Limited English Proficiency (LEP) status to Fluent English Proficiency (FEP) status.

D. LAC—Language Assessment Committee:  committee with responsibilities which include identifying and generally meeting the needs of Non-English Proficient (NEP) and Limited English Proficiency (LEP) students.

E. Lau—Informal reference to Civil Rights Act and required school districts to provide special assistance to English Language Learners who were unable to benefit from an education conducted primarily in English.

F. LEP—Limited English Proficiency:  students have a primary language other than English and are unable to participate effectively in school when English is the language of instruction (Also known as English Language Learners [ELL]).

IV. Language Assessment Committee (LAC)

The Building level Language Assessment Committee will coordinate and oversee the educational program of limited English proficient students.  The LAC will be composed of the Building Administrator or designee, classroom teacher(s), guidance counselor, parents/guardians when appropriate, ESL teacher and other ESL consultants who may be involved with the committee on an as needed basis.  The LAC meetings will be scheduled and conducted by the ESL teacher.

        The LAC responsibilities will include the following:

1. Review the state home language surveys to identify potential Limited English Proficient (LEP) students who have not already been identified through mandatory special education screening, parent or teacher referral.

2. Administer multi-criteria evaluations to potential LEP students annually.

3. Make determinations from multi-criteria evaluations about the student’s placement, programming, amount of services, time of delivery of services and types of programs.

4. Meet at least annually to develop and/or revise ELLP.

5. Provide progress reports to parent/guardians on same schedule as school report cards.

6. Make recommendations for placement and program type for the next school year.

7. Recommend modification of ESL support services or reclassification of a student from limited English proficiency to full English proficiency.

8. Notify parent or guardian in writing or if necessary in person of all decisions (in a language they comprehend) and their right to appeal.

9. Carry out annual monitoring for three years after student’s reclassification to full English proficiency.

English as a Second Language Program

1. Instruction will be provided during regular school hours.  Additional time may be provided as appropriate with the parent’s consent.

2. Student’s grade placement will be age appropriate.

3. ESL staff, classroom teacher and school staff will coordinate efforts on behalf of the students.

4.                  ESL staff will extend instruction into the classroom providing support to the ESL student and sharing the cultural diversity and new language with other students.  Content teachers will support Limited English Proficient (LEP) students in their achievement of the Learning Results with the support of the ESL teacher through sheltered English.

5. Instructional space for ESL will be provided that is comparable to that available for non-ESL students.

6. Amount of time spent with the ESL staff will be determined by the LAC Committee based on age and need of student.

7. Home/school coordination will be conducted as part of an outreach effort to parents of ESL students.

8. Adaptive instruction materials will be provided as appropriate to ELLs.

9. LEP students must participate in an annual WIDA administered secure test that will measure ELP in Math, Science and English Language Arts.

10. Comparable instruction materials will be provided.

ESL Staff Requirements and Responsibilities

1. ESL teacher will hold State of Maine certification with ESL endorsement.  ESL tutor may provide instruction under the supervision of the ESL teacher.

2. Administer multi-criteria evaluations used to determine eligibility.

3. Communicate with parents regarding progress of students using available resources to access parents in their own language.

4. Recommend ongoing modifications of revisions to the Lau plan as needed for resubmission to the school committee.

5. Recommend reclassification or exiting students based on the WIDA (2005) assessment and multi-criteria evaluations as needed.

6. Provide meaningful cultural and language information to students, teachers and classmates.

7. Insure that high school students receive appropriate career and/or educational information and that all post graduate opportunities are available to them.

8. Monitor currently enrolled students who have exited the ESL program for a period of three years; monitor students screened, but not considered eligible for ESL services.

Identification of English Language Learner Students

The process for identifying ESL students should be completed within 15 days following the opening of school or registration of a new student.  Input from sources listed below will be utilized.

1. Home Language Surveys (provided at the time of school registration) are administered to all students.

2 Informal observation/interview (part of the registration process).

3. ESL staff notified of possible new ELL students.

4. ESL staff meets informally with parents.

5. Review previous school records (cumulative folder)

6. The WIDA language proficiency assessment measure of placement (to be administered as close to day of student’s arrival as is reasonable) must be conducted for all students whose home language survey indicates a language other than English.

Assessment of English Language Proficiency and Academic Skills

LEP student will be assessed for level of English language proficiency (i.e. beginning, emerging, developing, expanding or advancing):

1. Consultation with classroom teacher(s) and parents.

2. Anecdotal information from student and family/guardian.

a. Annually as stipulated in NCLB (No Child Left Behind) administer English language proficiency measures of WIDA beginning in 2005 (LAS or IPT until then).

b. Testing in content areas when comprehensible.

c. Oral and written assessment of English

d. One or more of the following tests:

(1) Language Assessment Scales (LAS)

(2) IDEA Proficiency Test (IPT)

(3) Bilingual Verbal Ability Tests (BVAT)

(4) ACCESS—a mandatory test of reading, writing, listening and speaking

Record Keeping for Identified ESL Student

Guidance counselors or their designee, who maintain records on all students, will maintain ESL student files.  The responsibility for updating the files (student language assessment, ESL educational plans, reviews and reclassification information) will be assigned to the ESL staff.

Reclassification, Transfer and Exit

Exit and partial exit decisions of students from the ESL program will be based on multi-criteria assessments that will review language skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing, as well as performance in all academic areas.  Exit from ESL programming will occur when the student is able to competently perform in a regular (mainstream) setting.

Parent Notification and Option to Withdraw Approval

The Language Assessment Committee will meet with the parents or guardians to discuss any changes in exit or partial exit reclassification and of their right to challenge the reclassification.  This information will be given in a language that the parents or guardians can understand.

Students who have been identified beyond Level V of English language proficiency will be monitored by the ESL teacher for a two year period after reclassification to FEP.  The ESL teacher will review progress of ESL student’s grades once per semester for a period of three years.

Policy Adopted: December 20, 2000

 

Policy Revised: October 5, 2005

 

Life Sustaining Emergency Care – IHBAK

 

A primary concern of M.S.A.D. #35 shall be with the health and safety of its students.  In emergency situations involving accident or illness, school employees should undertake reasonable efforts to provide first aid or life-sustaining emergency care to the extent of their knowledge and training, and/or to seek the assistance of school medical personnel or other staff members to obtain emergency assistance for the student.

For those students who may present an ongoing need for medical interventions at school, including a need for life-sustaining emergency care, school personnel shall convene a team meeting for the purpose of developing an individualized plan to address the student’s specialized health needs.  The team should include persons at the school who are knowledgeable about the student, as well as the student’s parents and a school administrator.  The Team may consider requests from the parents that alternative forms of life-sustaining emergency care be used as part of that plan, but those requests must be substantiated by specific medical documentation from the student’s physician.  The Team shall not approve a parental request to deny all life-sustaining emergency care for a student, but may specify that only certain types of intervention are appropriate in a particular situation.

For the purpose of this policy, “life-sustaining emergency care” means any procedure or intervention applied by appropriately trained school staff that may prevent a student from dying who, without such a procedure or intervention, faces a risk of imminent death.  Examples of life-sustaining emergency care include:  efforts to stop bleeding, unblocking airways, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (“CPR”).

Legal Reference:   29 USC § 794(a)

Cross Reference:   JLCE – First Aid and Emergency Medical Care

Policy Adopted: January 5, 2005

 

Policy Revised: November 17, 2010

Marshwood Adult & Community Education – IHD

 

An educational program for adults shall be established and maintained in the school system.  This program shall provide, at convenient times and at reasonable costs, opportunities for residents of the community and surrounding areas to receive instruction in subjects commonly taught in the public schools and in such other fields as recommended by the Superintendent and approved by the Board.  Appropriate recognition certificates of attendance and satisfactory performance of work shall be issued upon completion of units and instruction.

 

Through its various programs and courses for adults, the Board shall seek to meet the needs of adults of all ages who, for whatever reason, have been unable to secure a high school diploma in a regular school program, who need additional training to become more efficient in their chosen occupations, or who would like to pursue interests relating to academic, vocational or enrichment activities.

 

In extenuating circumstances and in accordance with procedures approved by the Board, students who are 16 years of age or older up to age 20 and who are enrolled as day students at Marshwood High School may earn up to two credits toward a Marshwood High School diploma.

 

Legal Reference:   20-A MRSA § 8601 et seq.

 

Cross Reference:   IKF – Graduation Requirements

 

Policy Adopted: June 5, 1991

 

Policy Revised: October 20, 1999; January 4, 2012

 

Marshwood Adult & Community Education – Procedures – IHD-R

 

Two high school credentialing programs are offered through Marshwood Adult & Community Education (MACE): a MACE High School Diploma and a General Educational Development (GED) credential.  Additionally, under special circumstances, students enrolled at Marshwood High School may earn up to two high school credits through MACE.

 

Acceptance into either credentialing program or credit-bearing classes requires the following:

 

  • An interview with the Adult Education Director and/or the Director’s designee

  • A review of previous student work, educational experiences, and/or other relevant information

  • The student’s signature on a “Student Contract” which includes a code of behavior.

 

A.  ENROLLMENT IN A HIGH SCHOOL CREDENTIALING PROGRAM AT MACE

1. Individuals who are not enrolled in a state approved grade 9-12 program (including a home school program) may enroll in MACE credentialing programs.

 

2. Participants must complete all required assessments, pretests, tests, and/or post-tests to determine appropriate program and class placement.

 

3. Adult Education high school diploma candidates may not earn their high school credential or graduate prior to the year their high school class is scheduled to graduate.

 

4. One (1) Adult Education credit per course will be granted when a student has satisfactorily completed 45-60 hours of educational study prior to the end of the semester in which the work was initiated.

 

5. Beginning at age eighteen (18), an Adult Education student may test for a GED. The State of Maine allows a seventeen-year-old (17) to test for a GED if s/he meets the criteria for “documented immediate need” or if s/he has not attended a 9-12 High School program for one year.

 

6. In accordance with State of Maine funding requirements, Maine GED candidates must complete 12 hours of GED preparation activities and classes prior to taking their final examination.

 

B.  NON-CREDENTIALING CLASSES FOR CURRENTLY-ENROLLED MARSHWOOD HIGH   SCHOOL STUDENTS:

 

Students must be at least sixteen (16) years old to participate in an Adult Education course for credit.

 

Students may earn up to two (2) credits through MACE toward an MHS diploma. (See policy IKF for explanation of external credits accepted for high school graduation).

 

Students will sign a contract which specifically identifies expectations of a MHS student in the adult education setting.  This contract requires signatures from the following individuals:

a. Student

b. Student’s parent(s)

c. Guidance department

d. MACE Director or designee

e. MHS Principal or designee

 

Class supply fees are the responsibility of the student.

 

Students electing to take adult education courses and classes, which are not offered for credit, may do so as space permits with the approval of the Director of MACE.  All course fees and costs will apply.

 

Policy Adopted: May 7, 1980

 

Policy Revised: August 25, 1982, October 1, 1997 and January 4, 2012

Policy for Participation in Graduation Programs –  IKFB

 

A student who has completed local and state requirements for a diploma is entitled to receive a diploma from Marshwood High School. To be eligible for participation in the graduation ceremony, the individual must have completed all graduation requirements prior to the date of the ceremony.

Graduation expenses are a responsibility of the graduating class. Funds are raised by class-initiated and executed fundraising activities and by class dues assessment which is voted each year by the class.

Early in the senior year the graduating class determines the expenses necessary for their graduation. These expenses may include: cap and gown, honor cards, programs, tickets, flowers, police services at graduation programs, scholarships, gifts to the school, individual souvenir gifts to class members and banquet expenses.

Due to the fact that it is necessary to commit funds early in the senior year, it is necessary that every class member who plans to participate in the graduation program pay his/her share of the expenses.

1. All financial obligations of each member of the senior class participating in the graduation program must be paid in full by May 15. The student must be in good standing at the time of graduation which shall mean not serving a suspension, expulsion or other disciplinary action specified in the student code of conduct.

2. Should a senior not graduate, then he/she will be refunded his/her contribution.

3. Should a senior decide after making his/her determination by May 15 that he/she does not wish to participate in the graduation program, he/she will not be refunded his/her contribution.

4. A student who is not a member of the graduation class who wishes to participate in graduation due to early or late completion of graduation requirements in a given year must make application to the Guidance Office by October 1. A conference between the student, parents and school representative shall be held. If these steps are completed, the student may be granted standing in the graduation class with the approval of the principal.

5. The school principal will have discretionary powers to provide for school payment of supplemental charges in the case of students unable to pay these charges.

Policy Adopted: November 15, 1995

 

Policy Revised: April 5, 2006

Programming in the Least Restrictive Environment – IHBAG

 

MSAD #35 shall provide program for students with disabilities in the least restrictive educational environment that can appropriately address the student’s needs.  Toward that end, MSAD #35 shall ensure that, to the maximum extent appropriate, students with disabilities are educated with students who are not disabled, and that special education, separate schooling or other removal of students with disabilities from the regular educational environment occurs only when the nature or severity of the disability is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily.

Determinations regarding programming in the least restrictive environment shall be made by the student’s Pupil Evaluation Team (PET) and shall draw upon a multidisciplinary assessment of the student’s needs. MSAD #35 shall make available, as appropriate, the full continuum of educational placements when making placement determinations.

The Superintendent, in consultation with the Director of Special Education, may develop and promulgate procedures for implementing this policy and may, from time to time, amend those procedures as necessary.

Legal References: 20 USC § 1412(a)(5)

34 CFR §§ 300.550-.552

Ch. 101 §§ 11.1-11.3 (Nov. 1999) (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Policy Adopted: December 1, 2004

 

Programming in the Least Restrictive Environment Administrative Procedure – IHBAG-R

 

Determinations regarding least restrictive programming may be made by the student’s Pupil Evaluation Team (PET) in the following manner:

A. The PET should first assess whether education in the regular classroom, with the use of supplementary aids and services, can be achieved satisfactorily.  In making that determination, the PET should assess each of the following factors:

      1.    What supplementary aids and services may assist the student in obtaining a satisfactory education in the regular classroom.

               Supplementary aids and services may include, but are not limited to, resource room services, itinerant services, assistive technology services, modifications of curriculum, use of teacher aides, and consultation services from special educators.

               When assessing supplementary aids and services, the PET need not order placement in the regular classroom if it would require modification of the regular curriculum beyond recognition or would result in the student not having to learn any of the skills normally taught in that regular education curriculum.

      2.    A comparison of the benefits the student would receive in the regular education classroom with those that the student would receive in a more restrictive setting, such as a self-contained program.

               The assessment of benefits should consider both academic and social benefits of participation in the placement at issue.  The PET should also assess academic and social detriments for the student that may arise from the placement at issue.

               In some circumstances, large social benefits of regular education may outweigh small academic benefits, just as large academic benefits of a more restrictive setting may outweigh small social benefits of a regular education placement.

      3.    What effect would placement of the student in the regular classroom have on other students in the classroom?

               The PET need not place a student in the regular classroom when the student’s behavior, even with supplementary aids and services, would be so disruptive that the education of other students is significantly impaired.  Nor would the PET need to place the student in the regular classroom when the student would require so much of the teacher or the aide’s time that the rest of the class suffers.

      4.    What the financial cost would be of the supplementary aides and services accompanying an appropriate placement in the regular classroom.

               Placement in the regular classroom may not be rejected under this factor simply because it would be incrementally more expensive than placement in a more restrictive setting.  Yet  MSAD #35 need not educate a student in the regular classroom if the cost of such a placement would significantly impact upon the education of other students.  In most circumstances, MSAD #35 need not place a student in the regular classroom if such placement requires that the student have his/her own full-time teacher.

B.   If the PET determines after assessing the above factors that the student is unable to be educated satisfactorily in the regular classroom with supplementary aids and services, the PET shall then determine the maximum extent of mainstreaming that the student may appropriately receive.

      In making this determination, the PET shall consider the full continuum of alternative placements—such as placing the student in regular education for some academic classes and in special education for others, mainstreaming the student for nonacademic classes only, or providing interaction with non-disabled students during lunch and recess.

      In making placement determinations, the PET shall attempt to give preference to placements in the student’s neighborhood school district.  When the special services needed by the student are sufficiently specialized or expensive that they are provided by  MSAD #35 only in a school building other than the student’s neighborhood school, the PET may place that student in the school where the specialized services exist, rather than replicate those services in the neighborhood school.  This determination should not impact, in most circumstances, on the PET’s determination regarding the extent to which the student is able to participate in regular education.

      Placements in residential programs shall be made only when the PET determines that the student is not otherwise able to receive some educational benefit from a day program.

Legal References: 20 USC § 1412(a)(5)

34 CFR §§ 300.550-.552

Ch. 101 §§ 11.1-11.3 (Nov. 1999) (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Policy Adopted:   December 1, 2004

Post-Secondary Enrollment Options – IHCDA

 

The intent of this policy is to establish the requirements for student enrollment in post-secondary courses taken before high school graduation.  A mid-year report will be presented to the Board for general information regarding number of students pursuing this option. This policy will be included in the MHS student handbook.

 

Eligible Institutions

 

Students may take courses at accredited post-secondary institutions, eligibility subject to approval by the administration.

 

Student Eligibility

 

A student must meet the following criteria prior to enrolling in a post-secondary course:

(Note: these are statutory requirements).

 

1.      Have a minimum of a “B” (or 3.0) average in his/her courses overall;

 

2.      Meet the course admission standards of the eligible institutions;

 

3.      Provide the evidence of parent/guardian approval for taking the course; and

 

4.      Obtain approval from the principal and guidance counselor.

 

Exceptions to Eligibility

 

A student enrolled in grade 11 or 12 who does not meet the “B” (or 3.0) average in his/her courses overall is eligible to take a postsecondary course provided that he/she:

 

A.      Has been assessed and received a recommendation to take the course from the school   administration; and

 

B.      Has been approved for participation in the course by an eligible institution.

 

Awarding of Credits

 

The eligible institution shall grant full credit to any student who successfully completes a course. High school graduation credit for a course taken under this policy shall be awarded as follows:

 

A.      The course must meet for a minimum of one semester.

 

B.      The student must earn a passing grade in the course.

 

C.     Attendance must satisfy the instructor’s requirements.

 

D.     If the above criteria are met, the student shall receive one Carnegie unit of high school credit for each three or four credit course.

 

Financial Assistance

 

A.      MHS will support students in obtaining any state funds or applicable financial assistance that may be available.

 

B.      The student and his/her parents/guardian are responsible for paying all fees including tuition, textbooks, course fees, and transportation costs.

 

Legal reference: 20-A MRSA§4771 et seq.

 

Policy Adopted: April 3, 2002

           Promotion, Retention and Acceleration of Students – IKE

It is the intent of the MSAD #35 Board of Directors to provide sequential instructional programming that provides opportunities for students to meet the content standards of the Maine Learning Results and District curriculum.

While most students will advance from one grade to another at the end of the academic year, some students may benefit from retention at the same grade level or acceleration to another grade level. Any decisions made concerning promotions, retentions or accelerations shall be made with the best interest of the individual student as the primary concern.

A.           Criteria

The following criteria will be used in considering placement of students at any given   grade level. The items that follow will be given the highest level of consideration in deciding upon promotion, retention or acceleration.

1. Achievement of the content standards as demonstrated through use of assessment measures utilized in the District;

 

2. Success achieved in remedial programs, tutoring, summer school or other opportunities provided for the student;

 

3. Potential benefit from the grade level placement decision that is being considered;

 

4. Record of attendance;

 

5. Social/emotional maturity and age;

 

6. Program options;

 

7. Student attitude; and

 

8. Parental concerns.

B.           Retention

Retention shall be considered as an alternative to promotion, when it will benefit the   student. Parents shall be notified as early as possible in the event retention is being       considered. A decision regarding retention will involve discussion within a team of   individuals including the student’s parent(s), classroom teacher(s), guidance counselor and principal.

C.           Acceleration

Decisions regarding acceleration shall be made by the principal after discussion with the student’s parents, the student’s teacher(s), the Gifted and Talented instructor and other        professional staff or consultants deemed appropriate by the principal.

D.           High School Grade Level Assignment

Successful completion of the requirements specified in the Board’s policy IKF (Graduation Requirements) and demonstrated achievement of the mandated content   standards as established by Department of Education rules or regulations will be   required for graduation.

Assignment to high school grade levels will be based on the number of credits earned prior to the beginning of the current school year.

For sophomore status, a student must have earned 5 credits, for junior status 10 credits and senior status 15 credits.

E.           Transfer Students

For students who transfer into the school system from another state, home school or an educational program not required to meet the content standards of the Maine Learning Results, the principal will determine the grade level placement and/or the fulfillment of   credit requirements.

For decisions regarding promotion, retention or acceleration, the principal shall be responsible for making the final decision. A parent who is dissatisfied with the principal’s decision may file a written appeal with the Superintendent. The Superintendent’s decision shall be final.

Policy Adopted: May 1, 1991

 

Policy Revised:     November 17, 1999 and December 20, 2006

Referral/Pre-Referral of Students with Disabilities – IHBAA

 

It shall be the policy of M.S.A.D. #35 to refer all school-age students suspected of having a disability that requires special education to the IEP Team for an evaluation in all suspected areas of disability.  Referrals of students to the IEP team may be made by parents at any time and by professional school staff and other persons knowledgeable about the child’s educational needs.  Any such referral should be made in accordance with procedures that may be approved by the Superintendent of Schools.

Regardless of the source of the referral, a referral will be considered received by the school unit on the date that the written referral is received by the office of the Director of Special Education.  It shall be signed and dated by the Special Education Director or designee, thereby indicating the date of the receipt of that referral.

The Superintendent of Schools, in consultation with the Director of Special Education, may develop procedures for referral and the use of pre-referral interventions within M.S.A.D. #35, and may from time to time amend those procedures as necessary.

Legal References: Ch. 101, §§ II(23), III, IV(2)(D), (E), V(4)(A) (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules (August 2007).

Policy Adopted: December 6, 1989

 

Policy Revised: March 10, 1991, January 8, 2003,  November 17, 2010 and September 23, 2013 (at policy meeting)

Referral/Pre-Referral of Students with Disabilities Administrative Procedure – IHBAA-R

M.S.A.D. #35 shall refer to the IEP Team all school-age students suspected of having a disability that requires special education and related services.  Referrals to the IEP Team may be made by a child’s parent, by professional school staff, or by others with knowledge of the child.  Referrals should be made and processed consistent with these procedures.

A.     Referrals by Parents

A parent may refer his or her child to the IEP Team at any time.  That referral shall be made in writing directly to the office of the Director of Special Education.  Should the parent seek to make a referral through other professional staff (such as teachers, guidance counselors, or administrators), that professional staff member shall directly assist the family in making the referral in writing to the office of the Director of Special Education.  Should a parent attempt to make a referral orally, professional staff shall assist the parent in reducing that referral to writing and submitting it to the office of the Director of Special Education.

A parent referral shall be processed consistent with these procedures and governing timelines even if the child is receiving interventions pursuant to the District’s pre-referral procedures (discussed below).  Those pre-referral procedures shall continue during the referral process, however.

B.     Referrals by Staff

Any professional employee of the school unit may refer a child to the IEP Team regardless of the results of initial child find activities, but only after completion of any pre-referral intervention process used by the school unit.  The school unit may move directly forward with the referral process in those circumstances where the school unit and parent agree to do so.  Even in that situation, however, pre-referral interventions will continue during the referral process.

Professional school staff shall prepare a referral in writing and shall submit that referral directly to the office of the Director of Special Education.

C.     Referrals by Others

Individuals or agency representatives (including representatives of the Department of Health and Human Services) with knowledge of the child may refer that child to the IEP Team regardless of the results of initial child find activities but only after completion of any pre-referral intervention process used by the school unit.  The school unit may move directly forward with the referral process in those circumstances where the school unit and parent agree to do so.  Even in that situation, however, pre-referral interventions will continue during the referral process.

Should such a person attempt to make a referral orally, professional staff shall assist that person in reducing that referral to writing and submitting it to the office of the Director of Special Education.

D.     Receipt of Referral

Regardless of the source of the referral, a referral is received by the school unit on the date that the written referral is received by the office of the Director of Special Education.  It shall be signed and dated by the special education director/designee, thereby indicating the date of the receipt of that referral.

E.      Time Line for Processing Referral

Once the referral has been received in the office of the Director of Special Education, the IEP Team shall review existing evaluation data and determine the need for additional evaluations.  The IEP Team may conduct its review without a meeting.  If additional evaluations are needed, M.S.A.D. #35 must send a “consent to evaluate” form to the parent within 15 school days of receipt of the referral.  Also upon receipt of the referral (from any source), M.S.A.D. #35 shall send the parent its written notice form documenting that referral.

Once the office of the Director of Special Education receives the signed consent for evaluation back from the parent, M.S.A.D. #35 shall have 45 calendar days to complete the evaluation and to hold an IEP Team meeting to determine whether the student qualifies for special education services. If the student is identified as a child with a disability in need of special education, the Team should develop an IEP for that child either at that same meeting or within 30 calendar days of determining that the student is eligible.

M.S.A.D. #35 shall implement the IEP as soon as possible following the IEP Team meeting when the child is found eligible, but no later than 30 calendar days after that meeting.

F.      Transfer Students

Students who have already been identified as in need of special education services and who transfer into the school unit from another school unit within Maine shall, on enrollment and in consultation with the parent, be provided with FAPE (including services comparable to those described in the child’s IEP from the previous school unit) until M.S.A.D. #35 either adopts the child’s IEP from the previous unit or develops, adopts, and implements a new IEP.

Students who have already been identified as in need of special services and who transfer into the school unit from another school unit from outside of Maine shall, on enrollment and in consultation with the parent, be provided with FAPE (including services comparable to those described in the child’s IEP from the previous school unit) until M.S.A.D. #35 conducts an evaluation to determine whether the student is eligible for special education and, if so, develops, adopts, and implements a new IEP.

If the transfer student’s current IEP from his or her prior school unit is not available or is believed to be inappropriate by either the parent or the school, M.S.A.D. #35 should develop a new IEP through appropriate procedures within a short time after the student enrolls at the school.

If a child transfers into the school unit after the referral time line has begun in the previous school unit but before an eligibility determination has been made, the time line referenced above for completing that process shall not apply if M.S.A.D. #35 is making sufficient progress to ensure a prompt completion of the evaluation, and the parent and school unit agree to a specific time when the evaluation will be completed and the eligibility decision made.

Pre-Referral Procedures

Professional school staff members who observe that a student is encountering academic or functional difficulties in school that interfere with the student’s education shall document those specific difficulties on a pre-referral checklist.

The school staff member shall then develop intervention strategies using the intervention checklist that accompanies the pre-referral checklist. The staff member may consult with other school employees and/or the student’s parents in developing the intervention strategy. The intervention strategies shall have an established time period for implementation, and at the end of that time, its success shall be assessed and documented at the bottom of the intervention checklist. If the intervention strategies have not been effective or if the interventions are demonstrated to be effective but require continued and substantial effort that may include the provision of special education and related services, the staff member shall refer the child to the IEP team consistent with the procedures set forth above.

M.S.A.D. #35 shall notify parents whenever their child has demonstrated educational difficulties that have led to completion by a staff member of the pre-­referral checklist and intervention strategy checklist.  That notification of pre-referral interventions should include copies of the completed checklists and shall request that the parents contact the staff member who has completed the documents. That notification shall also inform parents that they have a right to refer their child directly to the IEP Team if they suspect that their child may need special education services. M.S.A.D. #35 may advise the parents as to why it may be appropriate to have the child participate in the intervention strategies prior to a referral to the IEP team, but M.S.A.D. #35 shall not reject or delay the referral until the completion of the intervention strategies.

All notes from the pre-referral process and, if relevant, team meetings and all the data collection procedures that may have been developed through this process shall be considered by the IEP Team and shall become part of the child’s special education file.  For children who do not qualify for special education services, all pre-referral documents are kept in the child’s cumulative folder for future reference and for ongoing educational planning.

The general education interventions developed through this pre-referral process shall be continued in the event of a referral while the referral is being handled by the IEP Team, and the resulting data shall become part of the child’s special education file.

Special education due process procedures shall not be used to address parental concerns regarding successful implementation of these pre-referral procedures, and the failure to use this pre-referral process may not be used in special education due process proceedings to establish that the school unit has failed to meet its child find or referral obligations.

Legal Reference: Ch. 101, §§ II(23), III, IV(2)(D), (E), V(4)(A) (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules) (August 2007)

Policy Adopted: December 6, 1989

Policy Revised: March 10, 1991, January 8, 2003, November 17, 2010, September 23, 2013 (at policy meeting)

Religious Expression in the Schools – IMD

Provisions of both the United States and Maine constitutions bar government involvement, in any form, which has the direct effect of promoting religious purposes. At the same time, MSAD # 35 realizes that students have a right to personal beliefs, and this right does not end at the schoolhouse door. School must be a place where personal beliefs are treated with fairness and respect.

The Board recognizes that a student’s education would be incomplete without an understanding of the role of personal beliefs in school ceremonies and observances in history and culture. The district shares responsibility with the community to develop in its students appropriate moral and ethical character incorporating ideals of liberty, justice, the pursuit of happiness, and equality of opportunity.

Religious expression in public schools involves a careful balancing of free speech rights, personal expression and the right to free exercise of religion without promoting or establishing religion.

Student Prayer and Religious Discussion in General

  • Students have the same right to engage in individual or group prayer and religious discussion during the school day as they do to engage in other comparable activities.

  • Students may pray in a non-disruptive manner when not engaged in school activities or instruction and subject to the rules that normally apply in school.

  • Students also may participate in before-or after-school events with religious content. School officials may neither discourage nor encourage participation in such events.

  • The right to engage in voluntary prayer or religious discussion free from discrimination does not include the right to have a captive audience listen or compel other students to participate.

School Staff Neutrality Regarding Religious Activity

School staff members, when acting in their official capacity, are prohibited from endorsing, soliciting, encouraging participating, or directing religious activities with students, on campus or at school-sponsored off-campus events.

Teaching about Religion

  • Schools may teach about the history of religion, comparative religion, the Bible, the Koran or other religious scripture-as-literature, and the role of religion in the history of the United States and other countries.

  • Instruction about religion must be secular (such as in the context of history or comparative religions), and must not favor, promote, or demean the beliefs or customs of any particular religion or sect.

Freedom of Expression or Activity by Non-Students

Schools may not permit undue influence proselytization, religious  recruitment, or demonstration involving preference of one belief over another by nonstudents on school premises during school hours or during off-campus, school-sponsored events.

Student Expression through Dress

Students may display religious messages on items of clothing to the same extent that they are permitted to display other comparable messages. When wearing particular attire, such as yarmulkes and head scarves, during the school day as part of a student’s religious practice, schools generally may not prohibit the wearing of such items unless the item poses a safety risk.

Student Expression through School Productions and Displays

For both class and extracurricular purposes, students regularly produce drama and other theatrical events. Whether produced as part of a class activity (such as a drama class or as a school-sponsored club), the production is a school-sponsored event or activity over which the school retains control and responsibility.

As with instruction, the history of religion, comparative religion, the Bible (or other scripture)-as-literature, and the role of religion in the history of the United States and other countries all are permissible elements in theatrical production. Concerts may appropriately include music related to religious themes.

Schools may display religious symbols on a temporary basis, and may be combined with examples of the practice of other religions as a multicultural display or for some other education purpose.

School Publications

Students have the right to express their individual views, including religious views, in official school publications such as a school newspaper or yearbook in a manner that maintains this orderly operation of the school.

Policy Adopted: February 16, 1983

 

Policy Amended: December 21, 1994, October 2, 1996 and November 20, 2013

 

Role of the Maine Educational Assessment in the Comprehensive Local Assessment System – ILAA

 

The Maine Educational Assessment (MEA) will be incorporated into MSAD #35’s Comprehensive Local Assessment System (CLAS). It will be administered to students in grades 4, 8 and 11 and recorded on their permanent transcript.

 

In addition, performance standards on the common assessments of the Comprehensive Local Assessment System will be compared with the performance levels on the MEA.  The comparison of student assessment results will be used to align common assessments and inform classroom instruction.

 

The inclusion of the MEA provides an additional type of measure of student achievement.  It will not be used as the sole source of certification for a content standard or cluster.

 

If a student meets or exceeds standards on the MEA, his/her performance will be included in the CLAS.  MEA scores will only be used if they benefit an individual student. If added to a student’s CLAS scores, the MEA will be added at a level consistent with the purpose and design of the MEA; at the content level in mathematics and science and at the content cluster level in English Language Arts.  These scores will count 20% of the CLAS body of evidence.

 

This policy will be reviewed and adjusted as needed at the end of the first year of implementation.

 

Policy Adopted: October 20, 2004

 

School Volunteers – IJOC

The Board recognizes that community members can provide valuable services to the schools by sharing their time, talents and experience.  An effective volunteer program allows students to benefit from individual attention, provides enrichment opportunities that supplement the regular educational program, allows teachers to focus on teaching and learning by relieving them of non-teaching tasks, provides interested community members an opportunity to become directly involved with education, and strengthens the relationship between school and community.

The Board approves the use of volunteers to support the school system’s instructional programs and extracurricular activities.  The Board adopts this policy to provide direction for the school system’s volunteer program.

For the purpose of this policy, a volunteer is a person who provides services, without compensation or benefits of any kind or amount, on an occasional or regular basis in the schools or in school activities.

All volunteers shall be at least 18 years of age unless their volunteer work is part of a class, is done to fulfill a service learning or community service requirement for graduation, or is done by a recognized student organization.

Some, but not all, activities volunteers may provide assistance including the following:

        A.      Tutoring students on a one-to-one or small group basis under the direct supervision of the classroom teacher;

        B.      Using their special musical, artistic or other talents to provide enrichment experiences and extend student learning;

        C.      Reading to children;

        D.      Playing instructional games;

        E.      Providing services in libraries, lunchrooms and playgrounds;

        F.      Accompanying students on field trips;

        G.      Assisting teachers in assembling instructional materials; and

        H.      Assisting in school plays, music programs and other extracurricular activities.

Volunteers serve under the direction and supervision of the building principal or designated staff.  When volunteers work with children, their activities will be under the direct and immediate supervision of the classroom teacher, coach, activity adviser, or other designated employee.

Approval, assignment, continuation, or termination of volunteers shall be at the discretion of the building principal.

All volunteers working under the supervision of an MSAD 35 employee (outside the presence of that employee) will be required to have a criminal background check, including a sex offender record check.  To minimize exposure to potential liability, we recommend that schools not allow parents who are registered sex offenders to volunteer in the schools or to chaperone either school day or extended field trips, even when their own children are involved.

Staff must have their use of volunteers approved in advance by the building principal. Volunteers will only be assigned to staff who requests them.

Volunteers are expected to abide by all Board policies, procedures and school rules when performing their assigned responsibilities.  The building principal shall make volunteers aware of applicable policies, procedures, and rules before they undertake their first assignment through a volunteer orientation, volunteer handbook, or other means.

Volunteers should perform only those tasks that have been assigned.

Volunteers will not have access to confidential information in student records except as allowed by federal or state law or regulations and will be responsible for maintaining confidentiality regarding information seen or heard while working as a volunteer.

Anything a volunteer sees or hears in the classroom and any records he or she may see shall remain confidential.  Exceptions would include any information that may jeopardize the safety of any students or staff.  The volunteer shall report this information to the classroom teacher.

All volunteers must annually sign the Student Confidentiality Memorandum of Understanding for each building that is available at each school.  A copy will be filed in each building.

Volunteers may not transport students in private vehicles except as allowed by Board policy.

The Superintendent will be responsible for devising a method for evaluating the effectiveness of the volunteer program on an annual basis.

Persons interested in volunteering time or services should contact the building principal.  Prospective volunteers will be required to complete a written application.

Cross References: EEAG – Student Transportation in Private Vehicles

IJOA – Field Trips and Excursions

Policy Adopted: November 19, 2008

 

Policy Revised: April 25, 2012

 

M.S.A.D. #35

Superintendent of Schools’ Office

 

180 Depot Road                                                                    TEL 207.439.2438

Eliot ME 03903                                                                     FAX 207.439.2531

Volunteer Release Form

My signature below constitutes authorization to check my employment history, including without limitation, criminal arrest and conviction record checks, reference checks, and release of investigatory information possessed by any state, local or federal agency.  I further authorize those persons, agencies or entities that M.S.A.D. #35 contracts in connection with my volunteer application to fully provide M.S.A.D. #35 any information on the matters set forth above.  I expressly waive in connection with any request for or provision of such information, any claims, including without limitation, defamation, emotional stress, invasion of privacy, or interference with contractual relations that I might otherwise have against M.S.A.D. #35, its agents and officials, or against any provider of such information.

 

___________________________ ___________________________________

Signature   Printed Name  (Last, First, Middle Initial)

 

Date _____________________________

The following information is necessary to provide the State for the above referenced check:

1.      Date of Birth:  ____________________________________

2. Address:_____________________________________________________________

3.      PLEASE PRINT ALL former names (maiden name, former married name(s) and any alias used):

__________________________________________________________________________

Please check the school(s) in M.S.A.D. #35 in which you will be volunteering:

Marshwood High School                 ________

Marshwood Middle School             ________

Marshwood Great Works School    ________

Central Elementary School              ________

Eliot Elementary School                  ________

Volunteers should assume the obligation to maintain high standards of ethical behavior and are expected to maintain confidentiality regarding student performance and student records.

A criminal record check is required for all community and parent volunteers when working directly with a child or children outside of the regular classroom setting.

A criminal record check must be performed annually.

Student Assessment/Local Assessment System –   ILA

A “local assessment system” is defined as a coordinated collection of assessments administered to students that, as a whole, provides information on individual students, the school, and MSAD #35 with respect to achievement of the content standards of the system of Learning Results.

Through this policy, the Board adopts and directs the Superintendent to implement the MSAD #35 Local Assessment System. The Superintendent shall be responsible for reviewing the Local Assessment System for compliance with applicable statutes and rules and for certifying to the Commissioner that it is in compliance with Maine Department of Education standards.

The purpose of the Local Assessment System is to provide information that will be used to guide and enhance classroom instruction, monitor student progress, and certify student achievement with respect to the MSAD #35 curriculum and Maine’s Learning Results. In addition, the Local Assessment System is designed to provide valid and reliable information on student achievement in order to evaluate educational programs and practices and to make informed decisions related to curriculum and instruction, professional development, and the allocation of resources to better meet students’ needs.

The following general principles apply to the Local Assessment System.

A.      Assessment will be aligned with the curriculum and with the performance indicators of the content standards of the Learning Results.

B.      The Local Assessment System will use multiple measures of student learning for each grade span (K-4, 5-8, and 9-12). The assessment measures should be developmentally appropriate for the age span.

C.     The System is intended to provide for a fair and equitable opportunity for students to demonstrate knowledge and understanding.

D.     The System will include at a minimum classroom, school, MSAD #35, and state levels of assessment. Regional and commercially produced tests may be used, but commercially produced tests may not carry a majority of the weight in determining student performance.

E.      Neither the Maine Educational Assessment (MEA) nor a commercially produced test may be the only measure of student achievement.

F.      Effort shall be made to see that testing contributes to the learning process rather than detracts from it.

G.           Accommodations may be made in an assessment based on the needs of a student as established in the student’s Individualized Education Plan or Section 504 Plan.

To ensure that each student has an ample opportunity to demonstrate achievement of the content standards of the Learning Results, the Local Assessment System will include provisions for “replacement” of common assessments.  Replacement is the means by which a student with low performance is provided the opportunity to demonstrate an acceptable level of proficiency in a content area or content cluster at a grade span through another, additional assessment.  A replacement assessment will address the content area(s) covered by the original assessment, but shall not be identical to the original assessment.

The Board recognizes that teachers and school administrators will be primarily responsible for administering assessments and for collecting, organizing, and interpreting information. School personnel should be appropriately trained to develop, use, and adapt assessment data.

The Superintendent will be responsible for ensuring that provisions are made for review and analysis of information obtained through the Local Assessment System and for appropriate instructional intervention when individual students or groups of students fail to achieve performance standards.

The Superintendent will be responsible for implementing a record-keeping and reporting system that will be used to provide understandable information to the Board and to students, parents, teachers/professional staff, administrators, and the community.  Data will be presented in a way that conveys school and MSAD #35 performance on the content areas of the system of Learning Results and allows for comparison to statewide performance.

The Board will annually review the results of the Local Assessment System.

Legal References: 20-A M.R.S.A.§6201-6205

Ch.127 §§ 2,4 (Me. Dept. of Ed. Rules)

Policy Adopted: August 25, 2004

 

Policy Revised: February 1, 2006

Student Computer and Internet Use – IJNDB

 

M.S.A.D. #35 computers, network, and Internet access are provided to support the educational mission of the schools and to enhance the curriculum and learning opportunities for students and school staff.  This policy and the accompanying rules also apply to laptops issued directly to students, whether in use at school or off school premises.

Student use of school computers, networks and Internet services is a privilege, not a right.  Compliance with M.S.A.D. #35’s policies and rules concerning computer use is mandatory.  Students who violate these policies and rules may have their computer privileges limited, suspended, or revoked.  Such violations may also result in disciplinary action, referral to law enforcement, and/or legal action.

M.S.A.D. #35 computers remain under the control, custody, and supervision of the school unit at all times.  M.S.A.D. #35 monitors all computer and Internet activity by students.  Students have no expectation of privacy in their use of school computers.

M.S.A.D. #35 utilizes filtering technology designed to block materials that are obscene or harmful to minors, including pornography.  M.S.A.D. #35 takes precautions to supervise student use of the Internet, but parents should be aware that the M.S.A.D. #35 cannot reasonably prevent all instances of inappropriate computer use by students in violation of Board policies and rules, including access to objectionable materials and communication with persons outside of the school.  M.S.A.D. #35 is not responsible for the accuracy or quality of information that students obtain through the Internet.

Students and parents shall be informed of this policy and the accompanying rules through handbooks, the school website, and/or other means selected by the Superintendent.

The Superintendent is responsible for implementing this policy and the accompanying rules.  Additional administrative procedures or school rules governing the day-to-day management and operations of M.S.A.D. #35’S computer system may be implemented, consistent with Board policies and rules.  The Superintendent may delegate specific responsibilities to the Technology Coordinator and others as he/she deems appropriate.

A copy of this policy shall be included in all school, parent, and employee handbooks or otherwise distributed to all school employees and students.

Legal Reference: 47 USC § 254(h)(5) (Children’s Internet Protection Act)

Cross References: GCSA/GCSA-R – Employee Computer and Internet Use/Rules

IJNDB/IJNDB-R – Student Computer and Internet Use/Rules

IJNDC – Website/Website Pages

IJNDC-R Website Guidelines

IJNDC-E – Guidelines Governing the Publishing of Student Information on the MSAD #35 Website

Policy Adopted: February 27, 2008

 

Policy Reviewed: January 9, 2012

 

Policy Revised: December 19, 2012

Student Computer and Internet Use Rules – IJNDB-R

 

These rules accompany Board policy IJNDB (Student Computer and Internet Use).  Each student is responsible for his/her actions and activities involving MSAD #35 computer, networks and internet services, and for his/her computer files, passwords and accounts.  These rules provide general guidance concerning the use of MSAD #35’s computers and examples of prohibited uses.  The rules do not attempt to describe every possible prohibited activity by students.  Students, parents and school staff who have questions about whether a particular activity is prohibited are encouraged to contact a building administrator or the Technology Director.

 

A. Consequences for Violation of Computer Use Policy and Rules

Student use of MSAD #35 computers, networks and internet services is a privilege, not a right.  Compliance with MSAD #35’s policies and rules concerning computer use is mandatory.  Students who violate these policies and rules may have their computer privileges limited, suspended or revoked.  Such violations may also result in disciplinary action, referral to law enforcement and/or legal action.

The building principal shall have the final authority to decide whether a student’s privileges will be limited, suspended or revoked based upon the circumstances of the particular case, the student’s prior disciplinary record and any other pertinent factors.

 

B. Acceptable Use

MSAD #35’s computers, networks and internet services are provided for educational purposes and research consistent with MSAD #35’s educational mission, curriculum and instructional goals.

All Board policies, school rules and expectations concerning student conduct and communications apply when students are using computers.

Students are also expected to comply with all specific instructions from teachers and other school staff or volunteers when using MSAD #35’s computers.

 

C. Prohibited Uses

Examples of unacceptable uses of MSAD #35 computers that are expressly prohibited include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

1.      Accessing Inappropriate Materials – Accessing, submitting, posting, publishing, forwarding, downloading, scanning or displaying defamatory, abusive, obscene, vulgar, sexually explicit, sexually suggestive, threatening, discriminatory, harassing, bullying/cyberbullying and/or illegal materials or messages.

2.      Illegal Activities – Using MSAD #35’s computers, networks and internet services for any illegal activity or in violation of any Board policy or school rules.  MSAD #35 assumes no responsibility for illegal activities of students while using school computers.

3.      Violating Copyrights – Copying, downloading or sharing any type of copyrighted materials (including music or films) without the owner’s permission.  MSAD #35 assumes no responsibility for copyright violations by students.

4.      Copying Software – Copying or downloading software without the express authorization of the Technology Director.  Unauthorized copying of software is illegal and may subject the copier to substantial civil and criminal penalties.  MSAD #35 assumes no responsibility for illegal software copying by students.

5.      Plagiarism – Representing as one’s own work any materials obtained on the internet (such as term papers, articles, music, etc.). When internet sources are used in student work, the author, publisher and website must be identified.

6.      Non-School-Related Uses – Using MSAD #35’s computers, networks and internet services for non-school-related purposes such as private financial gain; commercial, advertising or solicitation purposes; or any other personal use not connected with the educational program or assignments.

7.      Misuse of Passwords/Unauthorized Access – Sharing passwords, using other users’ passwords, and accessing or using other users’ accounts.

8.      Malicious Use/Vandalism – Any malicious use, disruption or harm to MSAD #35’s computers, networks and internet services, including but not limited to hacking activities and creation/uploading of computer viruses.

9.      Unauthorized Access to Blogs/Chat Rooms – Accessing chat rooms or news groups without specific authorization from the supervising teacher.

D.   No Expectation of Privacy

MSAD #35’s computers remain under the control, custody and supervision of MSAD #35 at all times.  Students have no expectation of privacy in their use of school computers, including email, stored files and internet access logs.

 

E. Compensation for Losses, Costs and/or Damages

The student and his/her parents are responsible for compensating MSAD #35 for any losses, costs and/or damages incurred by MSAD #35 for violations of Board policies and school rules while the student is using MSAD #35 computers, including the cost of investigating such violations.  MSAD #35 assumes no responsibility for any unauthorized charges or costs incurred by a student while using MSAD #35 computers.

 

F. Student Security

A student is not allowed to reveal his/her full name, address, telephone number, social security number, photographs or other personal information on the internet without prior permission from a teacher.  Students should never agree to meet people they have contacted through the internet without parental permission.  Students should inform their teacher if they access information or messages that are dangerous, inappropriate or make them uncomfortable in any way.

 

G. System Security

The security of MSAD #35’s computers, networks and internet services is a high priority.  Any student who identifies a security problem must notify his/her teacher immediately.  The student shall not demonstrate the problem to others or access unauthorized material.  Any user who attempts to breach system security, causes a breach of system security or fails to report a system security problem shall be subject to disciplinary and/or legal action in addition to having his/her computer privileges limited, suspended or revoked.

 

H. Additional Rules for Laptops Issued to Students

The Board’s policy and rules concerning computer and internet use apply to use of laptops at any time or place, on or off school property.

1.      Laptops are loaned to students as an educational tool and are only authorized for use in completing school assignments.

2.      Before a laptop is issued to a student, the student and his/her parent must sign the school’s acknowledgement form.  Parents may be required to attend an informational meeting before a laptop will be issued to their child.

3.      Students are responsible for the proper care of laptops at all times, whether on or off school property, including costs associated with repairing or replacing the laptop.  MSAD #35 offers a self-insurance program for parents to cover replacement costs and/or normal wear and repair costs for damages not covered by the laptop warranty.  Parents who choose not to purchase insurance should be aware that they are responsible for any costs associated with loss, theft or damage to a laptop issued to their child.  The insurance does not cover intentional damage of computers by students.  Any intentional damage to a laptop will be paid by the student or his/her parents/guardians.

4.      If a laptop is lost or stolen, this must be reported to the school principal immediately.  If a laptop is stolen, a report should be made to the local police by the building principal immediately.

5.      Students are responsible for obeying any additional rules concerning care of laptops issued by school staff.

6.      Violation of policies or rules governing the use of computers, or any careless use of a laptop may result in a student’s laptop being confiscated and/or a student only being allowed to use the laptop under the direct supervision of school staff.  The students will also be subject to disciplinary action for any violations of Board policies or school rules.

7.      Parents will be informed of their child’s login password.  Parents should be aware that students can change passwords.  Parents are responsible for supervising their child’s use of the laptop and internet access when in use at home.

8.      The laptop may only be used by the student to whom it is assigned.

9.      Laptops must be returned in acceptable working order at the end of the school year or whenever requested by school staff.

Cross References: GCSA/GCSA-R – Employee Computer and Internet Use/Rules

IJNDB/IJNDB-R – Student Computer and Internet Use/Rules

IJNDC – Website/Website Pages

IJNDC-R Website Guidelines

IJNDC-E – Guidelines Governing the Publishing of Student Information on the MSAD #35 Website

Policy Adopted: February 27, 2008

 

Policy Reviewed: January 9, 2012

 

Policy Revised: December 19, 2012

Testing Programs –  IL/ILBA

M.S.A.D. #35 will utilize standardized testing as one of several methods by which to evaluate student progress.  This information will then be used to aid in program improvement, both for the District as a whole and for individual students.

The professional staff will establish, implement, and maintain a system-wide testing program to determine scholastic aptitude and achievement of students attending school in MSAD 35, and to assess the vocational program.  The measures of aptitude and achievement will be used to establish the goals of the instructional program, determine the success of the instructional program, and assist teachers in individualizing instruction.  The purpose of vocational assessment is to help in career planning.

Achievement test results of individual students are confidential data; they may be released to parents in a conference.  Tabulated results of standardized tests will be interpreted by trained staff and will be available to authorized school personnel.  The tabulated results will be handled in a professional manner and will not be released except as authorized by the School Directors of M.S.A.D. #35.

No personality tests or personality inventories will be administered to any pupil without the expressed written consent of the child’s parent or guardian.

M.S.A.D. #35 Student Testing Schedule

Grade              Group Assessment Time of Year

3-8                Maine Educational Assessment Spring

1,2,5,7,9       Stanford Winter/Spring

10                 Career Project Winter

11                 SAT Spring

Test Descriptions and Uses for Results

MEA:  Maine Educational Assessment

The Educational Reform Act of 1984, based on recommendations of the Governor’s Commission on the Status of Education in Maine, called for a comprehensive set of reforms directed toward school improvement.  The Maine Educational Assessment is one of the components of that legislation.

Uses:

 

•        provide information on the academic achievement and progress of Maine students;

•        establish a process for continuing evaluation of state educational goals and to aid in the development of educational policies, standards, and programs;

•        provide school officials with information to assess the quality, effectiveness, and appropriateness of educational materials and methods, and determine curriculum needs, including remediation and enrichment.

•        provide school staffs with information about individual students which may be used, with other information, to meet individual educational needs of the student;

•        identify year-to-year trends in student achievement; and

•        provide parents with information about the performance of their children on the assessment tests.

(Given in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8)

The Standard Test of Academic Skills (TASK) is administered to determine achievement.  The reading skill area measures comprehension, vocabulary, spelling, and English.  The mathematics skill area measures computation, concepts of numbers and applications.

(Given in grades 1, 2, 5, 7, and 9)

Uses:   The results are constantly being reviewed and used by counselors, teacher and special education personnel, to asses in individual’s achievement and to ascertain any possible learning problem.  The utilization throughout the school district enables professionals to view a student’s overall academic development.

Career Decision Making System

Grade 10 students use the “Choices” software in their English classes as part of a career exploration and educational project, jointly conducted by the sophomore teachers and counselors.  Students take the “Do What You Are” personality inventory and take an interest survey to create an interest profile.  The software is designed to help students begin to form their educational and vocational plans.

Uses:   Administered to all sophomores, it not only helps in the English research paper about careers, but serves as a springboard for the counselors to meet with each sophomore to discuss vocational/career goals.

Optional Tests

American High School Math Exam

Available to students of Calculus, Advanced Math, and Algebra II.

College Entrance Examination Board

•        Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test (PSAT) – Grade 10 and 11

•        Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) – Grades 11 (required by state)

•        Achievement Test (ACH) – Grades 9, 10, 11, 12

•        Advanced Placement (AP) – Grade 12

– AP English Lit & Composition

– AP English Language and Composition

– AP US History

– AP US Government & Politics

– AP History of Art

– AP Calculus

– AP Biology

– AP Chemistry

–        AP Physics B – new for 07-08

Policy Adopted: April 1, 1987

 

Policy Revised: March 17, 1993 and July 25, 2007

 

Website/Web Pages – M.S.A.D. #35 – IJNDC

 

M.S.A.D. #35 maintains an official website to provide general information about our school system, as well as information about educational programs, extracurricular activities, school events, and student and staff achievements.  This website is intended to support the educational mission of the schools, to enhance the curriculum and learning opportunities for students and staff, and to provide valuable information to the larger community about our schools.  The website does not create, nor is it intended to create, a public or limited public forum.

The Board will adopt guidelines to ensure that M.S.A.D. #35’s website is in compliance with applicable laws and meets appropriate educational and quality standards.  The Superintendent shall be responsible for implementing this policy, the District’s website guidelines, and any additional administrative procedures that may be needed to govern the day-to-day management of the website.  The Superintendent shall also be responsible for advising the Board of the need for any future amendments or revisions to the policy or guidelines.   The Superintendent may delegate specific responsibilities to District technology staff as he/she deems appropriate.

Legal References: 20 USC § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99

20-A MRSA § 6001

17 USC § 101 et seq.

47 USC § 1732

Cross References: GCSA – Employee Computer and Internet Use

GCSA-R Employee Computer and Internet Use Rules

IJNDB – Student Computer and Internet Use

IJNDB-R Student Computer and Internet Use Rules

IJNDC-R – School System Website/Web Pages Administrative Procedure

IJNDC-E Guidelines to Publish Student Information on the MSAD #35 Website

JRA – Student Education Records

Policy Adopted: June 19, 2002

 

Policy Revised: June 7, 2006 and February 1, 2012

 

Website Guidelines – M.S.A.D. #35 –  IJNDC-R

 

A.      Website Purpose

The purpose of M.S.A.D. #35’s official website is to provide general information about the school system as well as information about educational programs, extracurricular activities, and school events.  This website is intended to support the educational mission of the schools, to enhance the curriculum and learning opportunities for students and staff, and to inform the larger community about the schools.

B.      Website Structure

The website may include the following content areas:

        1.      System-wide information (such as Central Office, Technology, Transportation, Facilities, Food Service);

        2.      School Board information (such as members, officers, committees, meeting agendas, minutes, and policies);

        3.      School-wide information for each school;

        4.      Individual department, grade level and/or classroom information (which may include student work and/or teacher-created work and resources);

        5.      Information about school-sponsored extracurricular organization information;

        6.      Information about school events and activities;

        7.      Contact information for School Board members and school staff; and

        8.      Any other material deemed appropriate by the Board of Directors or Superintendent.

C.      M.S.A.D. #35 Authority and Webmaster Responsibilities

The District reserves the right to approve all website content and to edit, delete, or modify any web page content as it sees fit to comply with the intended purposes of the website and these guidelines.

 

The Superintendent shall designate a Webmaster, who shall be responsible for maintaining the school department’s website and monitoring all website activities for compliance with Board policies and established school guidelines, copyright laws, regulations, and these guidelines.  Further, any material posted on the website shall not violate any other Federal or State laws.  All materials to be posted on the site shall be approved by the building principal or his/her designee prior to being posted.  This shall include approval of all school-sponsored links.  Any links to other sites shall be school department related.  Any person or organization producing a web page that utilizes M.S.A.D. #35 students, any M.S.A.D. #35 school names, or organizations, must comply with these regulations.

 

Only the Webmaster and other school staff authorized by the Webmaster shall have password-protected access to the web server to place and remove web pages and contents.

D.      Website Content

        1.      M.S.A.D. #35’s website does not create, nor is it intended to create, a public or limited public forum.  All materials placed on the website must serve the educational mission of the school system.

 

        2.      Website content is limited to school-sponsored information and activities.  No personal student or staff web pages, chat rooms, or discussion groups are permitted on the website.

 

        3.      Web page content must comply with Board policies, administrative procedures, and school rules.

 

        4.      All materials placed on the website must meet academic standards for proper spelling, grammar, content, accuracy, and appearance.

If the Webmaster is unsure whether particular material is appropriate for the website, he/she shall consult with the Superintendent, whose decision shall be final.

E.      Confidentiality of Student Information

        1.      The website shall be in compliance with all applicable state and federal confidentiality laws and regulations.

 

        2.      At no time shall personal information about students (such as home address, telephone number, email address, birth date, social security number, etc.) or any other information made confidential by state or federal law appear on the website.  The website will not include any information that indicates the physical location of students at any given time, other than attendance at a particular school or participation in such activities.

F.      Confidentiality of Staff Information

        1.      At no time shall personal information about staff appear on the website (including home address, home telephone number, home email address, birth date, social security number, etc.)

 

        2.      Because the M.S.A.D. #35 website is maintained in part to enhance communication with students and their families, the school email addresses and/or school telephone numbers of staff are published on the website.

G.      Copyright

        1.      Appropriate permission will be obtained before any copyrighted or trademarked material is used on the website.  No copyrighted material may be reproduced, transmitted, or stored on M.S.A.D. #35’s website without obtaining permission from the copyright owner.

 

        2.      Students shall retain the copyright on materials that they create.

 

        3.      An appropriate copyright notice will appear with all copyrighted material published on the website.

 

        4.      Except for the above exceptions, all web pages and content on the website are the property of and owned by M.S.A.D. #35.

H.      Website Design and Accessibility

The Webmaster is authorized to develop standards for the design and appearance of M.S.A.D. #35’s website.  These standards will include measures to make web pages accessible to persons with disabilities.  M.S.A.D. #35 information available on the website will also be made available to the public in alternative ways upon request.

I.       Advertising

        The M.S.A.D. #35 website will not include any advertising, nor will it include any selling activities outside of publicity for school-sponsored and/or approved fundraising activities.

J.       Links to External Sites

        1.      The M.S.A.D. #35 website will not include links to any personal websites of students or staff.

 

        2.      The website may include links only to websites that have demonstrated educational value to students, staff, and/or the community, as deemed appropriate by the Superintendent or his/her designee.

 

        3.      The website shall include a disclaimer informing users that links are provided as a convenience, and that M.S.A.D. #35 does not endorse these sites or have any responsibility for the content of these sites.

K.      Additional Requirements

        1.      The website shall inform users about how to contact the Webmaster.

 

        2.      Each web page shall include the date the page was last updated.

 

        3.      The Webmaster will provide appropriate information to school users regarding technical requirements for publishing material on the website.

Cross References: IJNDC – M.S.A.D. #35 Website/Web Pages

IJNDC-E Guidelines to Publish Student Information on the MSAD #35 Website

GCSA/GCSA-R – Employee Computer and Internet Use/Rules

IJNDB/IJNDB-R – Student Computer and Internet Use/Rules

Policy Adopted: June 19, 2002

 

Policy Revised: June 7, 2006 and February 1, 2012

 

 

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